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WICHE in the News

Northwest Arkansas Democrat Gazette  | Monday, July 31, 2017

The Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education is expecting the state's next largest group of high school graduates in 2024-25, an increase of 9.5 percent. The group has produced high school graduate projections for its member states for decades and has recently started doing state profiles for the nation, said Peace Bransberger, a senior research analyst there.

 

Wall Street Journal  | Monday, July 24, 2017

U.S. college tuition is growing at the slowest pace in decades, following a nearly 400% rise over the past three decades that fueled middle class anxieties and a surge in student debt.

The number of high-school graduates is projected to remain flat through 2023, according to an analysis by the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education. 

The Washington Post  | Thursday, June 29, 2017

There's no upswing likely for several years in the annual output of high school graduates, according to the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education. Growth, when it comes, is likely to be led by students with a different profile than those who fed the college pipeline in generations past. 

 

Media Releases

Thursday, April 27, 2017

Boulder, Colorado – The Western Academic Leadership Forum (the Forum) presented the 2017 Academic Leaders Tool of the Year Award to Portland State University for its Desk Manuals Tool on Thursday, April 27, in Salt Lake City, Utah, during the Forum’s Annual Meeting. The theme of the annual meeting was “Designing for Quality in Higher Education Facet by Facet,” and the event’s keynote speech was delivered by WICHE President Joe Garcia.

Friday, March 24, 2017

Boulder, ColoradoThe Western Alliance of Community College Academic Leaders (the Alliance) presented the 2017 Bernice Joseph Award to the University of Hawai‘i Community Colleges for its Sector Mapping Tool on Thursday, March 23, in Long Beach, California, during the Alliance’s Annual Meeting.

Tuesday, December 6, 2016

The steady growth in high school graduates that led to significant expansion of higher education in the United States in recent decades is coming to an abrupt halt.