Higher Education News

U. of Texas Overhauls Program on Masculinity to Avoid Stigma

Chronicle of Higher Education - October 15, 2018 - 6:11pm
MasculinUT will continue to focus on reducing sexual assault, but the program will move away from the campus mental-health center.
Categories: Higher Education News

American U. Professor Is Awarded $1.33 Million in Age-Discrimination Lawsuit

Chronicle of Higher Education - October 15, 2018 - 5:03pm
Loubna Skalli Hanna’s lawyers argued that the provost’s denial of her bid for tenure was unlawful.
Categories: Higher Education News

#RethinkSchool: Highlighting STEM Research and Education Programs in DE and MD

U.S. Department of Education Blog | Ed.gov - October 15, 2018 - 2:10pm

During the Back to School tour, Diane Auer Jones visited colleges in Delaware and Maryland to celebrate successful institutions and meet with students as the new academic year begins. As the principal Deputy Under Secretary, Delegated to Perform the Duties of Under Secretary and Assistant Secretary for Postsecondary Education, Auer Jones visited colleges with high performing STEM programs and STEM-based career and technical education programs.

Diane’s first stop was at Delaware State University (DSU). DSU, located in Dover, is an Historically Black College that excels in competing for STEM research grants and engaging

Diane Jones visited with student neuroscience researchers at Delaware State University.

undergraduate and graduate students in research experiences.  She met with students working in a neuroscience laboratory and a plant molecular biology laboratory and viewed some of the presentations students had delivered at recent conferences.  She also visited the campus’s impressive aquaculture facility and visited the USDA Food Safety Laboratory housed on the campus.  She also met with campus leaders, including the President and Provost, and with a group of energetic and impressive student leaders who made great recommendations for how the Department could help students better understand Federal Student Aid programs.

Next, Diane traveled to the Community College of Baltimore County (CCBC), where she once served on the faculty of the Biology Department.  While on campus, she visited the new, state-of-the art science education building, as well as the campus’s high tech cyber security laboratory, its aviation technology program and its Fab Lab (fabrication laboratory), where students, faculty and members of the community can access laser cutters, 3-D printers, computer-controlled advanced manufacturing equipment and other

Diane Jones visited the Community College of Baltimore County’s aviation technology programs.

sophisticated instruments to develop new devices, technologies and prototypes to support new inventions.  A student group recently used the tools and equipment in the Fab Lab to develop a prototype for a newborn neonatal incubator that can be assembled in the developing world for around $200, thereby improving healthcare in regions where commercial neonatal incubators are unaffordable.  Diane also met with staff in the financial aid office to better understand how the Department could do more to support students and help institutions meet student financial need.

To wrap up her tour, Diane visited the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC). UMBC is led by President Freeman Hrabowski, who is world-renowned for the Meyerhoff Scholar’s Program, a program which has consistently resulted in the country’s highest rate of African American students getting into MD-PhD programs. While there, Diane met with the President’s Council, toured the biology building, visited a state-of-the-art interactive chemistry learning center, and discussed the institution’s new cyber security apprenticeship program. She also met with President Hrabowski to discuss a number of the Secretary’s higher education priorities.

Over the course of these visits, Diane was able to interact with and listen to educators, students and administrators to better understand how the Department can support innovation, expand postsecondary options and reduce regulatory burden and help students succeed.

 

Continue the conversation on Facebook or Twitter.

Note: This is a post in our #RethinkSchool series. The series features innovative schools and stories from students, parents and educators highlighting efforts across the United States to rethink school. The #RethinkSchool series presents examples of approaches schools, educators, families and others are using to rethink school in their individual and unique circumstances. Blog articles provide insights on the activities of schools, programs, grantees and other education stakeholders to promote continuing discussion of educational innovation and reform. The Department of Education does not endorse any educational product, service, curriculum or pedagogy.

 

The post #RethinkSchool: Highlighting STEM Research and Education Programs in DE and MD appeared first on ED.gov Blog.

Categories: Higher Education News

Harvard Admissions Trial Opens With Arguments Focused on Diversity

Chronicle of Higher Education - October 15, 2018 - 12:51pm
In a packed courtroom the lawyer representing critics of the university’s undergraduate admissions policy said, “Diversity is not on trial here.” Harvard’s lawyer suggested that without such a policy, the courtroom would not be as diverse as it is.  
Categories: Higher Education News

How Henrietta Schmerler Was Lost, Then Found

Chronicle of Higher Education - October 14, 2018 - 4:30pm
Almost 90 years ago, a young anthropologist was murdered in the field. The case still speaks volumes about sexual assault and how we explain it away.
Categories: Higher Education News

How a Low-Profile Leader Made Big Changes at Indiana U.

Chronicle of Higher Education - October 14, 2018 - 3:30pm
With little fanfare, Michael McRobbie has brought about a renewal on a campus where many once felt progress had halted.
Categories: Higher Education News

Harvard’s Race-Conscious Admissions Policy Goes on Trial on Monday. Here’s What to Expect.

Chronicle of Higher Education - October 12, 2018 - 5:03pm
The latest front in the fight over affirmative action opens in a federal courtroom in Boston and could have lasting implications for colleges nationwide.
Categories: Higher Education News

At Stanford, a Conservative Student Was Confronted at a Pro-Kavanaugh Event. Now He’s Pressing Charges.

Chronicle of Higher Education - October 12, 2018 - 3:17pm
The dust-up was just one of several campus clashes this week as some students celebrated the appointment of the newest Supreme Court justice.
Categories: Higher Education News

#RethinkSchool: Bringing Hopes and Dreams to Those Most in Need

U.S. Department of Education Blog | Ed.gov - October 12, 2018 - 3:14pm

Like moths to a light, people from all over the country gravitate to Washington, D.C. – longing to make a difference, witness history and understand the complexities of the political process. I am like many young transplants that moved to D.C. for work and began to understand the social justice issues that threaten those who are native to our nation’s capital.

However I, unlike many other young transplants, had to quickly navigate the complexities of the education system. From my own experience, I know the difference a quality education and support system can make on students growing up in poverty.

So, when I moved to D.C. as the sole caregiver for my teenage sister, I knew exactly what she needed to be able to thrive. She needed a quality education, healthy community and individuals who could serve as mentors. As I researched areas to live and send my sister to school, I discovered Anacostia is home to some of D.C.’s poorest and most violent neighborhoods. From food insecurity to lack of affordable housing, the residents in this community are confronted with daily obstacles.

When I got word that a new charter school, Digital Pioneers Academy (DPA), was opening in Anacostia, I was curious. I wondered if the founder received the same information about the area that I had. I wanted to know her hopes for the school and dreams for the poverty stricken community. Most of all, how they were going to Rethink School.

A student during computer class at the Digital Pioneer Academy

DPA founder Mashea Ashton is a longtime advocate for charter schools. She has worked to highlight the inequalities between district public schools and charter public schools, the myths surrounding charter schools, and the best practices to share with other school leaders. She believes that all students, regardless of where they live, should have access to a high-quality education, be it private, charter, or district schools.

In New Jersey, Ashton served as CEO of the Newark Charter School Fund (NCSF), a foundation established by Sen. Cory Booker to facilitate the growth and quality of charter schools in Newark. In a recent interview with Sen. Booker, he attributed the successes of Newark Public School to the extensive education reforms he helped bring about with NCSF. Upon returning to D.C., her goal was to bring high-quality education options to many disadvantaged D.C. children so that they can compete in the changing economy.

Students during computer class at Digital Pioneer Academy

DPA recently opened on August 20, 2018 in Ward 7, D.C.’s second poorest neighborhood. The school is the first middle school in D.C. with a focus on computer science. DPA serves 150 students and expects to add one grade per year. The school provides a unique, personalized educational experience that integrates best practices from schools across the country, preparing students to be innovators and active citizens in our technology-driven world. According to their website, there are more than 10,000 open computer jobs and 65% of children today will end up in one of those jobs in the future.

Ashton’s goals are to have all of her students achieve 2 years of academic growth each school year, be ranked as a Tier 1 school by their third year of operation and always have a student body that reflects the Anacostia community.

Rethink School means to question everything so that nothing limits students from being prepared for what comes next. A growing number of educators, parents, community leaders and entrepreneurs are being empowered with flexibility to innovate and provide students with increased education options within the public school system.

Thanks to a growing number of leaders, like Mashea Ashton, more low-income families living in neighborhoods like Anacostia will have more access to high-quality educational opportunities in their communities.

 

Denisha Merriweather is a Confidential Assistant in the Office of Communications and Outreach at the U.S. Department of Education.

Continue the conversation on Facebook or Twitter.

Note: This is a post in our #RethinkSchool series. The series features innovative schools and stories from students, parents and educators highlighting efforts across the United States to rethink school. The #RethinkSchool series presents examples of approaches schools, educators, families and others are using to rethink school in their individual and unique circumstances. Blog articles provide insights on the activities of schools, programs, grantees and other education stakeholders to promote continuing discussion of educational innovation and reform. The Department of Education does not endorse any educational product, service, curriculum or pedagogy.

The post #RethinkSchool: Bringing Hopes and Dreams to Those Most in Need appeared first on ED.gov Blog.

Categories: Higher Education News

Miami U. Senior Wins Chronicle’s Award for Young Journalists

Chronicle of Higher Education - October 12, 2018 - 11:43am
Megan Zahneis, a student at the university in Ohio, was honored with The Chronicle’s 2018 David W. Miller Award, which is presented to the top intern who worked at The Chronicle during the previous year.
Categories: Higher Education News

New Roles Focus on First-Generation Students’ Issues

Chronicle of Higher Education - October 12, 2018 - 8:00am
More four-year colleges are hiring managers to foster a sense of community among first-generation students.
Categories: Higher Education News

How 3 Colleges Changed Their Sexual-Assault Practices in Response to a National Survey

Chronicle of Higher Education - October 11, 2018 - 7:39pm
The survey, sponsored by the Association of American Universities, prompted more hiring for Title IX offices and other shifts to improve how campuses respond to reports of sexual misconduct.
Categories: Higher Education News

For U. of Virginia’s Miller Center, a Reckoning in the #MeToo Era

Chronicle of Higher Education - October 11, 2018 - 5:44pm
Complaints about sexual harassment inside the esteemed public-policy institute have provoked a difficult reflection about how big donors and scholars alike let its culture go so wrong.
Categories: Higher Education News

#RethinkSchool: AZ, UT, CO, and WY Lead the Charge for English Learners

U.S. Department of Education Blog | Ed.gov - October 11, 2018 - 3:21pm

As a former English learner, teacher of English as a second language, administrator of migrant education, and now director of the Office of English Language Acquisition, I approached my Back to School Tour with the goal of visiting places that #RethinkSchool for bilingual and multilingual students.

Dr. Mark Sorensen, the co-founder and CEO of the Service to All Relations (STAR) charter school in Flagstaff, AZ picked me up at the airport and drove me to his pride and joy. As we headed in the direction of the Navajo’s sacred mountains, he told me the story of STAR’s humble beginnings. Mark and his wife wanted to serve children from the Navajo reservation.

The needs of these students were not being met; about half of them weren’t graduating from high school. So they bought a junk yard, cleared it out and built their school. Seventeen years and many awards later, the STAR school is a model of innovation and customized learning. The Pre-K through 8th grade teachers promote literacy by integrating the Navajo language and traditional cultural knowledge into writing and science learning objectives. Because of the limited written Navajo text, the educators use full oral language immersion which includes the use of sign language. The Navajo culture is felt throughout the building and beyond. The students reach out to their reservation which sits just outside the school. Their approach to STEM directly impacts their community. A few of their meaningful projects include the creation of a large filter housed in an old school bus to solve the problem of the reservation’s contaminated well water, they developed economical cooling systems for homes using 5 gallon buckets so families can endure the hot summers, and the students harvested fruits and vegetables from the green house they built on campus to share with hungry families. STAR school’s culturally responsive approach to education is nimble, pertinent and exciting!

Jose Viana visits with a first grade English speaker/Spanish learner at Mill Creek Elementary in Millcreek, UT.

Would you like to experience a high-quality Dual Language Immersion Program where the subjects are taught half the day in English and the other half in Spanish? Then you have to go to Millcreek, Utah; yes, Utah.  Of the over 66,000 students enrolled in the Granite School District, 36% of them are English learners, speaking almost 160 different languages. The district has tackled this challenge by offering Dual Language Programs in 224 public schools in which ELs who speak a heritage language at home and monolingual English speakers take classes together with the goal of becoming fluent in both languages.  I had the opportunity to visit Mill Creek Elementary and see the local and international teachers in action. I am a native Spanish speaker, and after a tour through the classrooms from 1st grade to 6th grade, I could not tell which students were the English learners and which ones were the Spanish learners; they were more fluent in both languages than I was at their age. The bilingual students at Mill Creek are not only experiencing academic achievement, but cultural competence as well; and I quickly became really excited about our nation’s future. But the staff doesn’t do it alone. After the parent roundtable, one thing was very clear, the parents and teachers are working together to help the children discover their full potential and cultivate their creativity. There is no limit to what the Mustangs can accomplish! Fantástico.

Jose Viana met with Escuela Valdez School’s PTA, Principal and District Leaders.

I was talking to the treasurer from Escuela Valdez’s PTA, and when I asked her about the school’s parent liaison, she quickly corrected me and said, “You mean our angel.” During my time in Denver, I was able to experience Escuela Valdez’s commitment to its diverse community and their culture. This focus is embodied in their “angel,” who has established a true collaborative parent committee representing all the school’s races and ethnicities. When I asked her about this accomplishment, she simply said, “The power of together.” One of Secretary DeVos’ priorities is to empower families and individuals and improve family engagement in schools; Escuela Valdez exemplifies this philosophy. Together, parents and staff promote effective instruction by providing culturally relevant, individualized education for all learners through their innovative programs which include dual-language classrooms. Go Panthers – adelante!

Jose Viana with State Superintendent, District Leaders, Munger Elementary Principal, Jackson Hole High Principal and School staff at Munger Mountain Elementary in Jackson Hole, WY.

Principal Scott Crisp, who is a 2017 School Ambassador Fellow at the US Department of Education, hosted me at his school, Jackson Hole High. Everyone in his diverse school community is both a teacher and a learner! I had the pleasure of speaking to one of his 200 Latino students. He has lived in this country for only a couple of years and because of Jackson Hole’s academic rigor for all students, especially their English learners, he is quickly acquiring fluency while also participating in a couple of the school’s many AP courses. With innovative programs in engineering, robotics, fabrication, performing and visual arts, just to name a few, it’s no wonder why Jackson Hole is the number one high school in Wyoming and in the top 3% in the United States. The learning environment at JHHS is agile, relevant and exciting! Their motto, “Bronc pride” is right on point! How fortunate I was to also visit the only dual immersion magnet school in Wyoming. The school leaders and teachers at Munger Mountain Elementary in Jackson prepare bilingual and biliterate global citizens who achieve academic excellence and sociocultural competence.  Los Lobos meet the unique needs of their students and their community every day!

Jose Viana visits with a fifth grade Spanish speaker/English learner at Afflerbach Elementary in Cheyenne, WY.

I will always treasure my day visiting Laramie County Schools in Cheyenne. They empowered English learner families by facilitating a roundtable discussion with parents, students, teachers and school leaders from Afflerbach Elementary, Johnson Junior High and South High School. After I listened to their challenges and successes I had the opportunity to give them a preview of OELA’s new English Learner Family Tool Kit, which will help parents and guardians understand the U.S. education system. This unforgettable visit was deeply moving.

I feel honored to have toured these amazing schools. Each of them is rethinking education by using innovative approaches to meet the needs of their bilingual and multilingual students.  It was a privilege to encounter people doing life-changing work every day.  I came back to D.C. inspired and ready to share everything I learned. I am truly excited about our nation’s future because Arizona, Utah, Colorado, and Wyoming are leading the charge for our English learners.

 

Jose Viana is Director of the Office of English Language Acquisition at the U.S. Department of Education.

Continue the conversation on Facebook or Twitter.

Note: This is a post in our #RethinkSchool series. The series features innovative schools and stories from students, parents and educators highlighting efforts across the United States to rethink school. The #RethinkSchool series presents examples of approaches schools, educators, families and others are using to rethink school in their individual and unique circumstances. Blog articles provide insights on the activities of schools, programs, grantees and other education stakeholders to promote continuing discussion of educational innovation and reform. The Department of Education does not endorse any educational product, service, curriculum or pedagogy.

The post #RethinkSchool: AZ, UT, CO, and WY Lead the Charge for English Learners appeared first on ED.gov Blog.

Categories: Higher Education News

Transitions: Samuel Merritt U. Selects New Leader, U. of Mississippi Names Chief of Research

Chronicle of Higher Education - October 11, 2018 - 3:00pm
Ching-Hua Wang will become Samuel Merritt's second president in November. Josh Gladden has served as Ole Miss's interim vice chancellor of research since 2016.
Categories: Higher Education News

Chancellor Dies at Southern Illinois U.

Chronicle of Higher Education - October 11, 2018 - 8:04am
Carlo D. Montemagno had led the university’s Carbondale campus since August 2017.
Categories: Higher Education News

One Way to Help Students Become Knowledge Creators

Chronicle of Higher Education - October 11, 2018 - 7:59am
Having students assemble a “resource book” for her course, one instructor hopes, will show them how a research literature develops over time.  
Categories: Higher Education News

How Should Colleges Respond to Politics in Letters of Recommendation?

Chronicle of Higher Education - October 10, 2018 - 7:50pm
Professors who decline to write such letters for moral or political reasons are often unaware of campus policies to guide them — if they even exist.
Categories: Higher Education News

Charlie Kirk’s New Book, a Broadside Against Higher Ed, Is Heavy on the Anecdotes

Chronicle of Higher Education - October 10, 2018 - 7:20pm
In a scant 160 pages, the founder of Turning Point USA tells a series of stories, not all of them about “the battle on campus.”
Categories: Higher Education News

‘My Fights Are With My Peers’: When a Professor Gets Banned for Bullying

Chronicle of Higher Education - October 10, 2018 - 5:28pm
This scholar at the New School won’t be allowed to attend faculty or committee meetings, or public events where other faculty members’ work is being presented.
Categories: Higher Education News

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