Higher Education News

Appointments, Resignations, Deaths (12/31/2017)

Chronicle of Higher Education - December 31, 2017 - 4:32pm
Peter Provenzano Jr. became president at Oakland Community College in Michigan, and Deborah Bordelon was named provost and executive vice president for academic affairs at Columbus State University.  
Categories: Higher Education News

Why Education Matters to Your Health

Chronicle of Higher Education - December 29, 2017 - 2:20pm
Men and women who haven’t been to college live shorter, less healthy lives, and they’re actually losing ground compared to college graduates. It’s about more than money.
Categories: Higher Education News

A Dying Town

Chronicle of Higher Education - December 29, 2017 - 12:55pm
Here in a corner of Missouri and across America, the lack of a college education has become a public-health crisis.
Categories: Higher Education News

When Professors Cross Sexual Boundaries

Chronicle of Higher Education - December 29, 2017 - 11:43am
Distress and complications often follow when faculty members focus unwanted sexual attention on their students or junior colleagues. Here’s how college officials deal with such cases and try to resolve complaints.
Categories: Higher Education News

Drexel Professor Whose Charged Tweets Drew Fire From the Right Will Leave the University

Chronicle of Higher Education - December 28, 2017 - 12:36pm
“After death threats and threats of violence directed against me and my family, my situation has become unsustainable,” says George Ciccariello-Maher.
Categories: Higher Education News

At a Time of Change, These Baptist Colleges Are Staying the Course

Chronicle of Higher Education - December 21, 2017 - 4:52pm
Georgia’s Brewton-Parker College, Shorter University, and Truett McConnell University have doubled down on their religious identity. But two of them have seen sharp declines in enrollment.
Categories: Higher Education News

Coding and Collaboration with a Buddy System

U.S. Department of Education Blog - December 21, 2017 - 8:54am

For several years our kindergarten and third grade students were accustomed to pairing up as reading buddies to improve their literacy skills through a mentee/mentor relationship. As a result of that success we decided to use a similar model to encourage our kids to collaboratively explore coding.

Students Engaged Quickly

The first step was to find a coding platform that was best suited for our students, one that fosters creativity and diversity and encourages students to drive their own creations and progress at their own pace. It was easy to research and there are several options that are tailored to a school setting.

Once we selected one, we quickly watched our students engage with it after only a short introduction, which was amazing.  You just don’t get that level of engagement, cooperation and excitement in young students with traditional teaching practices like paper and pencil work. Our students were paving the way and creating their own content. Whatever our students imagined soon became reality on the screen.

There was always bustling around the classroom, with students exclaiming, “Wow, how did you do that? Can you show me?” We created a “Code and Tell” component at the end of our coding time, so students could share something they discovered with the class and teach each other something new while building on their oral presentation skills.

In an effort to show students that coding can have real life applications and to provide them an authentic audience with leaders in our district, we developed the Operation Code Happiness project. Through this project, a third-grade student could write a letter of introduction, including a short survey, to members of our school district’s leadership. These administrators, also known as VIPs, were asked to complete and return the survey. Upon receiving information from the VIPs, such as their favorite color, song or photograph, coding buddies worked collaboratively to design aproject specifically with their VIP in mind.

Huge Leaps of Growth

In the spring, each set of coding buddies had an opportunity to present their creation to a room full of VIPs and others interested in learning more about the students’ creative process and experience with coding. Through this effort, we saw huge leaps of growth in students’ problem solving and resilience in the face of difficult coding challenges.  It often took several attempts before coding buddies would get their creation to look, sound and move just right.  Students were motivated to complete their project as they had envisioned it for their VIP. They also leaned heavily on each other to learn new elements and build outstanding projects.

As we talk to other teachers in our school and at technology conferences, we know this is only the beginning of coding in our classrooms. Our students are excited by this unique opportunity to take charge of their learning and to weave coding throughout multiple disciplines. As teachers, we know that it’s not our job to have all the answers all the time. It is our job to supply the right learning tools and environment to set our students up for the best learning experience possible. Coding is the perfect tool to help create a collaborative and creative environment, no matter what the age or grade level.

 

Juliann Snavely is a Kindergarten Teacher at Keith Elementary located in West Bloomfield, Michigan. She has been an early childhood educator for nineteen years and has been learning to code with her students since 2014. Juliann was honored to be selected as a Michigan Voice Educator Fellow (2015-16) and as the Keith Elementary Teacher of the Year (2008).

Angela Colasanti is a 3rd grade teacher at Keith Elementary in the Walled Lake Consolidated School District.  Angela is a MI Educator Voice Fellow, a Galileo Teacher Leader and is passionate about coding with her students.

The post Coding and Collaboration with a Buddy System appeared first on ED.gov Blog.

Categories: Higher Education News

How Spaces Designed for Learning Can Change Teaching

Chronicle of Higher Education - December 21, 2017 - 8:24am
Sometimes, where students sit and where faculty members stand can have a meaningful impact.
Categories: Higher Education News

A Brief History of Students Secretly Recording Their Professors

Chronicle of Higher Education - December 21, 2017 - 7:45am
Recent efforts by a right-wing activist to recruit conservative students to spy on their liberal professors are just the newest iteration of what has become a notorious campus pastime.
Categories: Higher Education News

Think You Know What Type of College Would Accept Charles Koch Foundation Money? Think Again.

Chronicle of Higher Education - December 20, 2017 - 4:23pm
At some public regional universities, the foundation’s conservative politics have made it a tough sell. But a growing number of prestigious institutions now are among the top recipients of Koch funding.
Categories: Higher Education News

Education Dept. Approves New Wave of Students’ Claims Against Corinthian Colleges

Chronicle of Higher Education - December 20, 2017 - 12:04pm
The department announced on Wednesday that it had approved 12,900 requests for student-loan forgiveness from borrowers who said they had been defrauded by the now-shuttered for-profit college.
Categories: Higher Education News

What Colleges Need to Know About the Tax Overhaul Poised to Become Law

Chronicle of Higher Education - December 20, 2017 - 10:57am
The legislation could discourage charitable giving, would tax some rich colleges’ endowments, would tax some top-paid workers at nonprofit organizations, and would limit a key revenue stream in major college sports.
Categories: Higher Education News

‘Dreamers’ Make Desperate Plea on Capitol Hill

Chronicle of Higher Education - December 20, 2017 - 10:35am
In a day of marches, lobbying, and civil disobedience, undocumented students fight against time to make their case to Congress.
Categories: Higher Education News

New Tax Law Takes Aim at Higher Education’s Millionaires Club

Chronicle of Higher Education - December 19, 2017 - 6:49pm
In 2015, private nonprofit colleges minted 158 millionaires. Their institutions would have to pay a 21-percent tax.
Categories: Higher Education News

A Small College With a Big Endowment Gets Snared in Tax Bill

Chronicle of Higher Education - December 19, 2017 - 5:19pm
Kentucky’s Berea College, which charges no tuition and serves primarily low-income students, will probably have to pay a 1.4-percent tax on its endowment earnings after a revote on tax legislation.
Categories: Higher Education News

Public Comment Sought for Report on Obtaining Input from Rural Schools and Local Educational Agencies

U.S. Department of Education Blog - December 19, 2017 - 3:36pm

SUMMARY:  In accordance with section 5005 of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), the Secretary seeks information from the public regarding actions the Department of Education (Department) can take to improve how it considers the unique needs of rural schools and local educational agencies (LEAs) as it develops and implements its policies and programs.  The Secretary intends to use this information in issuing a final report, required under section 5005, describing the actions it will take to increase the consideration and participation of rural schools and LEAs in the development and execution of the Department’s processes, procedures, policies, and regulations. (Preliminary report in pdf format)

DATES:  We must receive your comments no later than February 18, 2018.

ADDRESSES:  Submit your comments through the Federal eRulemaking Portal or via postal mail, commercial delivery, hand delivery, or email.  To ensure that we do not receive duplicate copies, please submit your comments only once. In addition, please include the Docket ID (ED-2017-OCO-0139) at the top of your comments.

Federal eRulemaking Portal:  Go to www.regulations.gov to submit your comments electronically.  Information on using Regulations.gov, including instructions for accessing agency documents, submitting comments, and viewing the docket, is available on the site under the “Help” tab.

Postal Mail, Commercial Delivery, Hand Delivery, or Email:  The Department encourages commenters to submit their comments through the Federal eRulemaking Portal.  However, if you mail or deliver your comments in response to this request, address them to Michael Chamberlain, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW, room 5E260, Washington, DC 20202.  If you email your comments, send them to rural@ed.gov.

Privacy Note:  The Department’s policy is to make all comments received from members of the public available for public viewing in their entirety on the Federal eRulemaking Portal at www.regulations.gov.  Therefore, commenters should be careful to include in their comments only information that they wish to make publicly available.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:  Michael Chamberlain, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW, room 5E260, Washington, DC 20202. Telephone:  (202) 453-7527 or by email:  Michael.chamberlain@ed.gov.

If you use a telecommunications device for the deaf or a text telephone, call the Federal Relay Service, toll free, at 1-800-877-8339.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Background:  Section 5005 of the ESSA (Pub. Law 114-95), which was enacted on December 10, 2015, requires the Department to:

“review the organization, structure, and process and procedures of the Department of Education for administering its programs and developing policy and regulations, in order to—

(A) assess the methods and manner through which, and the extent to which, the  Department of Education takes into account, considers input from, and addresses the unique needs and characteristics of rural schools and rural local educational agencies; and

(B) determine actions that the Department of Education can take to meaningfully increase the consideration and participation of rural schools and rural local educational agencies in the development and execution of the processes, procedures, policies, and regulations of the Department of Education.”

Section 5005 also requires the Department to publish a preliminary report containing the information described above and provide Congress and the public with 60 days to comment on the proposed actions.  Thereafter, the Department must issue a final report to the Department’s authorizing committees in the U.S. House of Representatives and Senate and carry out each action described in the final report or explain to the authorizing committees the reason for not carrying out any action described in the final report.

Request for Information:  Since the passage of the ESSA, the Department has been engaging in the required review and report, including conducting listening sessions on issues facing rural schools and LEAs and ways the Department can address those issues.  It gives a brief overview of how the Department is organized and describes how the Department solicited and incorporated input from rural stakeholders as it developed the preliminary report.  Additionally, the report explains the processes we currently use to incorporate the rural perspective into our policies and procedures, including processes we have recently implemented in response to stakeholder input, and describes additional proposed actions we can take.

While we invite comment on the entire report, we particularly encourage comment on the proposed actions, as described in the section of the report titled “Additional Actions the Department Can Take to Increase Rural Stakeholder Input.”  Specifically, we request feedback on whether:

  1. The actions described in the preliminary report will meaningfully increase the consideration and participation of rural schools and LEAs in the development and execution of the Department’s processes, procedures, policies, and regulations; and
  2. There are other actions the Department can take to achieve this goal.

Accessible Format:  Individuals with disabilities can obtain this document in an accessible format (e.g., braille, large print, audiotape, or compact disc) on request to the program contact person listed under FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT.

Electronic Access to This Document:  The official version of this document is the document published in the Federal Register.  Free internet access to the official edition of the Federal Register and the Code of Federal Regulations is available via the Federal Digital System at:  www.gpo.gov/fdsys.  At this site, you can view this document, as well as all other documents of this Department published in the Federal Register, in text or Portable Document Format (PDF).  To use PDF, you must have Adobe Acrobat Reader, which is available free at the site.

You may also access documents of the Department published in the Federal Register by using the article search feature at:  www.federalregister.gov.  Specifically, through the advanced search feature at this site, you can limit your search to documents published by the Department.

(Copy of the preliminary report in pdf format)

The post Public Comment Sought for Report on Obtaining Input from Rural Schools and Local Educational Agencies appeared first on ED.gov Blog.

Categories: Higher Education News

Can a College Education Solve the Nation’s Prison Crisis?

Chronicle of Higher Education - December 19, 2017 - 2:41pm
Professors hope a federal experiment will prove that offering Pell Grants to prisoners is a good investment. It’s just as likely, though, that the program will be shut down by its political opponents.
Categories: Higher Education News

A New High-Tech Learning Center Changed How These Professors Teach

Chronicle of Higher Education - December 19, 2017 - 2:12pm
Special classrooms now available at the University of Maryland at College Park are making faculty members rethink the way they engage students.
Categories: Higher Education News

Applying Research to Real-World Problems

Chronicle of Higher Education - December 19, 2017 - 11:25am
How can scientists turn their work into solutions to societal problems? Here’s a primer for discussion about what the true mission of university research should be.
Categories: Higher Education News

Reining In Fraternities

Chronicle of Higher Education - December 19, 2017 - 11:23am
Fraternities, havens of good times, darker events, and sometimes both, have been accused of fostering excessive drinking and indifference to students’ health. Here’s what colleges are trying to do about it.
Categories: Higher Education News

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