Higher Education News

Teaching Newsletter: Welcoming Students to Your Discipline, 10/5/17

Chronicle of Higher Education - October 5, 2017 - 8:20am
How do you combat stereotypes of your field? 
Categories: Higher Education News

Should Universities Ban Single-Gender Discussion Panels?

Chronicle of Higher Education - October 4, 2017 - 5:57pm
A recent move by a school at George Washington University raises the question of how to best encourage gender diversity at the events, whether on campuses or at academic conferences.
Categories: Higher Education News

Justice Dept. Investigates Admissions Practices at Harvard, BuzzFeed News Reports

Chronicle of Higher Education - October 4, 2017 - 4:55pm
The department maintains that records requested under the Freedom of Information Act are exempt from disclosure.
Categories: Higher Education News

Understanding Teachers Make “All the Difference” for a High School Student with Dyslexia

U.S. Department of Education Blog - October 4, 2017 - 1:00pm

Note: October is Learning Disabilities/Dyslexia/Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Awareness Month.

A teacher can make the difference between a good day and a bad one.

Actually, they can make or break a child’s entire school year by understanding what accommodations in a 504 Plan or an individualized education program (IEP) can do to help a person like me who works every day to overcome the impact of dyslexia, dysgraphia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

I think I am lucky to have been surrounded by teachers who worked hard to make sure I was able to be as successful as my peers.

I have had a 504 Plan since the fourth grade. It’s supported me through elementary school, middle school and now into high school.

At the beginning of the year, I introduce myself and my accommodations through email. I think it’s important for my teachers to know why I benefit from something that most of the other kids in my class don’t use. The game changers for me include:

  1. Extra time
    Dyslexia makes me read slowly and work hard to decode words. This means that it takes me more time to take tests. Knowing that I can work hard and answer the questions correctly at my own pace is very helpful for me. I would like to be able to show my teacher what I know.
  2. Read on demand
    Reading and spelling are harder for me than my classmates. I can decode almost any word after my remediation; it just takes me some time to do it if it’s a harder word. If I am really stuck, I would like to ask for help to have the word or phrase read to me. It makes me way more comfortable in class to know that if I get stuck, my teacher will know that I really need the help.
  3. Small group testing
    It helps to be on my own or in a smaller group. If I am taking a test with the class I might get to the third question and someone next to me is finished with the test because they can read it faster. I’d like to be able to focus on the content and do my best.
  4. Technology
    I use my iPad to ear read (text to speech) everything I can. Eye reading is tiring for me. Sometimes, I use an app to change a handout to a readable PDF and then ear read it, if I need to. Normally, I just eye read the handouts. My iPad also has an app that will let me record the classroom lecture, if I need it. I don’t access the curriculum exactly like my peers, but the system in place right now works really well for me.
  5. Teacher notes
    I am dysgraphic, too. That means it is hard for me to put my thoughts onto paper, quickly. I learn best by listening to the teacher first and then practicing what I have learned. It is very hard for me to listen and copy things from the board or write things down as the teacher is talking. I take notes, but I miss a lot. The teacher’s notes help me make sure that I don’t miss anything when I am studying.
  6. Advanced notice when called on to read in class
    This accommodation makes me feel comfortable in class. It feels terrible if I think I might be called on to read out loud without knowing what I am going to read. If my teacher wants me to read something, they’ll just tell me the night before and I will practice first. I am a good reader now, but I still get nervous when I have to read out loud. Messing up on a word like ‘began’ feels really bad in a classroom full of my classmates. That’s what dyslexia will do to me.

With the help of my parents, my teachers and my accommodations, I’ve created a successful learning environment for myself. Because I need to work very hard to achieve the academic success I’ve had, I don’t take anything for granted. I appreciate my teachers who have made an effort to understand me and my accommodations.

Teachers really do make all the difference!

 

Carter Grace Duncan is a freshman in a Northern Virginia public high school. She is a youth advocate for Decoding Dyslexia Virginia who enjoys sharing her knowledge with students with disabilities about how accommodations in school can help create a pathway to academic success.

(Cross-posted at the OSERS blog.)

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The post Understanding Teachers Make “All the Difference” for a High School Student with Dyslexia appeared first on ED.gov Blog.

Categories: Higher Education News

U. of North Texas President Tried to Stop Donald Trump Jr. From Speaking on Campus

Chronicle of Higher Education - October 4, 2017 - 10:56am
The effort to cancel the appearance of the president’s son failed, even though students, faculty members, and alumni also voiced opposition.
Categories: Higher Education News

Penn State Fraternity Is Suspended After Student Is Found Unconscious

Chronicle of Higher Education - October 4, 2017 - 10:24am
The incident followed the death of a freshman at another fraternity’s initiation event in February.
Categories: Higher Education News

DeVos Keeps Higher Ed — and Reporters — at Arm’s Length

Chronicle of Higher Education - October 3, 2017 - 7:47pm
The education secretary’s aversion to national media, and her communication style, have created a knowledge gap for college leaders seeking to understand her philosophy on higher ed.
Categories: Higher Education News

U. of Mississippi Alumna Wins Chronicle’s Miller Award for Young Journalists

Chronicle of Higher Education - October 3, 2017 - 2:37pm
Clara Turnage, now a reporter for The Natchez Democrat, in Mississippi, was honored for articles she wrote during her Chronicle internship this past summer.
Categories: Higher Education News

Can a 20-Minute Test Tell Employers What a College Degree Cannot?

Chronicle of Higher Education - October 3, 2017 - 2:12pm
Some companies and education groups think so. A spate of attempts to assess job readiness offers a new challenge to the value of higher education.
Categories: Higher Education News

Instructors, Did You Ever Cheat When You Were a Student?

Chronicle of Higher Education - October 3, 2017 - 10:06am
There’s a good chance that, as professors, you’re now in a position to make or enforce rules about plagiarism and other forms of cheating. Has your past experience informed your teaching strategy?
Categories: Higher Education News

Undergraduate Research Surges, Despite Uncertainties Over Best Practices

Chronicle of Higher Education - October 2, 2017 - 7:51pm
All types of colleges are embracing research at the undergraduate level. Finding the best features and combinations of experiences, however, is very much a work in progress.
Categories: Higher Education News

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