Higher Education News

What Can Research Tell Us About Steep Cuts for Public Colleges?

Chronicle of Higher Education - June 6, 2018 - 6:54pm
Higher education has struggled for a decade to manage the economic and political instability following the Great Recession. Now researchers are trying to understand that struggle.
Categories: Higher Education News

Why One College Has Second Thoughts About the ‘Coalition’ — and Another Has High Hopes

Chronicle of Higher Education - June 6, 2018 - 5:01pm
Enrollment officials reach different conclusions about the usefulness of the Common App’s high-profile rival.
Categories: Higher Education News

As Hard as It Tries, Illinois Can’t Move On From Its Native American Mascot

Chronicle of Higher Education - June 6, 2018 - 3:54pm
The Chief Illiniwek symbol has been retired for more than a decade, but a new billboard and a trip by trustees cast doubt on the university’s ability to leave its mascot behind.
Categories: Higher Education News

Southern Illinois U. May Be About to Fire Its President

Chronicle of Higher Education - June 6, 2018 - 2:57pm
An agenda for a special meeting of the university system’s trustees, to be held on Friday, says they will act on an “appointment of acting president.” The current chief, Randy Dunn, says he wasn’t told of the meeting in advance.
Categories: Higher Education News

Southern Illinois U. Is About to Fire Its President

Chronicle of Higher Education - June 6, 2018 - 2:57pm
An agenda for a special meeting of the university system’s Board of Trustees, to be held on Friday, says it will act on an “appointment of acting president.” The current chief, Randy Dunn, says he wasn’t told of the meeting in advance.
Categories: Higher Education News

Southern Illinois U. Is Readying to Suddenly Oust Its President

Chronicle of Higher Education - June 6, 2018 - 2:57pm
An agenda for a special meeting of the Board of Trustees to be held on Friday says it will act on an "appointment of acting president." Randy Dunn says he wasn't told about it.
Categories: Higher Education News

What Students Can Do to Avoid Summer Melt

In our last post, we talked about the phenomenon of summer melt, where up to 1/3 of the students who graduate high school with plans to go to college never make it to a college campus.  We discussed what the student’s support team could do to help keep the student on track—but there’s also plenty the student can do to make sure their college plans don’t get derailed.

Open every piece of snail mail you get from the college, and read all of it.  You’re probably used to getting all kinds of mail from all kinds of colleges, but once you’ve decided on a college, anything and everything they send you needs to be read.  Just ask the student who opened the letter congratulating him for being admitted.  He didn’t read the next page, which told him he had a $42,000 scholarship.  Read it all.

Continue to check your email account.  Email may be almost as old school as snail mail, but it’s still how many colleges communicate with students—especially if they need something in a hurry.  The only way you find out what they need is to check email about three times a week in the summer.  And make sure to check your junk email folder; some colleges send emails to thousands of students, and your email account may think it’s spam.  It isn’t.

Look for the checklist.  Most colleges send you a checklist with everything you’ll need to do over the summer, and when you need to do it.  This checklist may come by snail mail, or as a link in an email, or maybe as a text.  Print it out, and put it on your refrigerator at home; that way, your parents can help you keep track of what to do as well.  If your college doesn’t give a checklist, there are others out there, such as this one from College Board.

Confused? Ask.  If there’s any point over the summer when you don’t know what you should be doing, call the college.  I know—students aren’t really crazy about talking to people on the phone, especially if they think the college will get the feeling that you don’t know what you’re doing.

Do it anyway.  Once a college admits you, they will move heaven and earth to have you register, attend and graduate.  There is nothing—NOTHING—they haven’t been asked before, so don’t feel like you’re the only one.  In fact, colleges have Student Services offices because so many students have so many questions.  If you don’t know how to contact them, call the admissions office, and they’ll tell you how.

It’s easy to feel alone in this transition to college, but you have a home team of family, friends and counselors who are there to help, even in the summer.  There’s a ton of people at your college—your new home—who want to help you too, even though they haven’t met you.  All you have to do is ask.

Make this happen.

 

Patrick O’Connor is a 2017-18 School Counselor Ambassador Fellow at the U.S. Department of Education.

Continue the conversation on Facebook or Twitter.

The post What Students Can Do to Avoid Summer Melt appeared first on ED.gov Blog.

Categories: Higher Education News

Why Male Mentors in the #MeToo Era Must ‘Engage More, Not Run for the Hills’

Chronicle of Higher Education - June 6, 2018 - 1:26pm
At a time of heightened awareness about sexual harassment, senior men are shying away from mentoring young women. That’s a step in the wrong direction.
Categories: Higher Education News

The Barrier to Rooting Out Nassar's Crimes? Michigan State's Ex-President Faults University Bureaucracy

Chronicle of Higher Education - June 5, 2018 - 6:08pm
Lou Anna K. Simon testifies before a U.S. Senate panel that while she did not know that a university sports doctor was sexually abusing gymnasts, she was "truly horrified" that it occurred during her presidency.
Categories: Higher Education News

Bureaucracy Posed a Barrier to Exposing Nassar's Crimes, Michigan State's Ex-President Tells Senate Panel

Chronicle of Higher Education - June 5, 2018 - 6:08pm
Lou Anna K. Simon testified that while she did not know that a university sports doctor was sexually abusing gymnasts, she was "truly horrified" that it had occurred during her presidency.
Categories: Higher Education News

Professors Decide Whether to Teach Summer Courses — for Cuts in Pay

Chronicle of Higher Education - June 5, 2018 - 3:01pm
Some faculty members are weighing their students’ need for credits against a drop in compensation for summer teaching.
Categories: Higher Education News

As Summer Pay Changes, Some Faculty Members Must Figure Out What Their Teaching Is Worth

Chronicle of Higher Education - June 5, 2018 - 3:01pm
Professors weigh students’ need for summer courses with a drop in compensation for teaching them.
Categories: Higher Education News

Catholic U. Trustees Clear Path for Layoffs of Tenured Professors

Chronicle of Higher Education - June 5, 2018 - 1:58pm
The controversial "academic renewal" plan, which would cut 9 percent of the faculty through buyouts or involuntary terminations, gets final approval.
Categories: Higher Education News

An Update of the Federal Law Governing Higher Ed Appears Dead. Now There’s a Fight Over Who Killed It.

Chronicle of Higher Education - June 5, 2018 - 11:46am
Much of the disagreement boils down to a basic point of contention between Senate Republicans and Democrats: Who owed whom a call back?
Categories: Higher Education News

Michigan State U. Employee Is Charged With Bestiality

Chronicle of Higher Education - June 4, 2018 - 2:57pm
The Michigan Attorney General's office on Monday charged a health physicist at the university with two counts of sodomy.
Categories: Higher Education News

Summer Melt: Why One Third of College-Bound Students Don’t Make It to Campus in the Fall

Graduation is one of the most exciting times in the life of a school counselor, but as tempting as it is to look at graduation as the end of a school counselor’s work with a class, the exact opposite is true, especially for students heading to college.  An astonishing number of students who walk across the stage at graduation with plans to go to college never get there. Too many students overlook the letters and emails colleges send over the summer, asking students to complete financial aid forms, turn in important health documents, sign up for orientation and more.

If a student misses any one of these steps, the college will assume the student isn’t coming to college after all, and they’ll remove them from their attendance records.  Suddenly, due to a couple of missed emails, the student’s plans for the fall, and for their future, take a turn for the worst.

This phenomenon is known as summer melt, and it affects more students than you might believe.  According to surveys, up to one third of all students who leave high school with plans to attend college never arrive at any college campus that fall.  Summer melt tends to hit low-income students hardest, as well as students who are the first in their family to go to college.

Realizing the devastating effect summer melt can have on students, there are some key steps the student’s support team can take to make sure their senior is on campus come the fall.

Text them reminders over the summer.  School counselors can still support their students after graduation by texting them.  Weekly reminders to check their email, complete their financial aid forms and register for classes can go a long way to keep students on track.  Texting programs can make it easy for counselors to reach large numbers of students quickly, so this really doesn’t take away from their summer vacations—and it can make a big difference.

Continue those weekly meetings.  Parents have long been advised to meet weekly with their senior for 20 minutes to discuss their college plans. Those meetings should continue in the summer, so families can review any mail or other communications the college has made.  If doubts arise over what should be done, they can call the college and discover the next steps to take.

Head to campus.  Older siblings can become part of the support team by taking the new high school graduate for a summer visit to campus.  Summer melt sometimes occurs just because the student has doubts or concerns about being successful at college, or if they’ve made the right choice.  There’s no better way to lose those doubts than to see themselves at school, meet their adviser, try out the food and buy some bookstore swag.  This is a perfect way for brothers and sisters to bond with a sibling, reminding them of the ties that don’t change, even if life does.

Students often feel overwhelmed by all the forms and information colleges ask for, and missing even one of those requests can really set back a student’s college plans.  Working together as a team throughout the college selection process—from the junior year, all the way to the fall of the student’s first year on a college campus—parents, counselors and siblings who are there to support and help the student every step of the way can make a world of difference.

 

Patrick O’Connor is a 2017-18 School Counselor Ambassador Fellow at the U.S. Department of Education.

Continue the conversation on Facebook or Twitter.

The post Summer Melt: Why One Third of College-Bound Students Don’t Make It to Campus in the Fall appeared first on ED.gov Blog.

Categories: Higher Education News

How Admissions Competition Brought New Rivalries, Strange Bedfellows, and 'An Us-Versus-Us Lawsuit'

Chronicle of Higher Education - June 3, 2018 - 5:00pm
CollegeNET, which is suing the sponsor of one admissions form, is powering a competing group’s admissions form. Oh, it’s awkward.
Categories: Higher Education News

What Do ‘White Guys’ Think About Race? This Professor Is Trying to Find Out

Chronicle of Higher Education - June 3, 2018 - 4:30pm
In more than 100 interviews with students, Nolan L. Cabrera has heard strong beliefs they don’t feel they can share publicly.
Categories: Higher Education News

Freshmen ‘Are Souls That Want to Be Awakened’

Chronicle of Higher Education - June 3, 2018 - 4:30pm
“I know your doubts and fears, and I’ll have your back till the end of the semester.” That’s the message that Bryan Dewsbury, a biology professor at the University of Rhode Island, wants to get across to first-year students.
Categories: Higher Education News

A Third of Your Freshmen Disappear. How Can You Keep Them?

Chronicle of Higher Education - June 3, 2018 - 4:30pm
Colleges redesign the first-year experience to improve retention, learning outcomes, and students’ sense of belonging.
Categories: Higher Education News

Pages

Subscribe to Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education aggregator - Higher Education News