Higher Education News

Why They Didn’t Report: Trump’s Challenge to Kavanaugh Accuser Provokes Stories of Campus Assault

Chronicle of Higher Education - September 21, 2018 - 1:34pm
A hashtag sprung up on Twitter on Friday in response to the president’s public doubting of the woman who has accused Brett M. Kavanaugh, the Supreme Court nominee, of sexual assault. Many are using it to describe what happened when they were assaulted in college.
Categories: Higher Education News

After Silent Sam’s Fall, Calls to Rename a Building at Duke Grow Louder

Chronicle of Higher Education - September 21, 2018 - 12:21pm
The building that houses Duke’s history department is named for Julian Carr, a philanthropist and “an architect of white supremacy in the early 20th century,” the department chair says.
Categories: Higher Education News

Big Donor’s Facebook Photos of 2 Black Students Unsettle Ole Miss

Chronicle of Higher Education - September 20, 2018 - 7:31pm
After Ed Meek illustrated a post about what he called the degradation of the university’s surrounding town with pictures of two African-American women, the chancellor, Jeffrey S. Vitter, quickly condemned it.
Categories: Higher Education News

Harvard Raised $9.6 Billion in Its Latest Campaign. Here’s What You Could Do With That Money.

Chronicle of Higher Education - September 20, 2018 - 4:09pm
The five-year project broke fund-raising records, earning enough to send an entire state to community college.
Categories: Higher Education News

Transitions: Shaw U. Makes Interim President Permanent, New Chief of Staff Named at American International College

Chronicle of Higher Education - September 20, 2018 - 3:43pm
Paulette Dillard has served as the interim leader of of Shaw since July 2017. Nicolle Cestero moves from Title IX coordinator to chief of staff at American International.
Categories: Higher Education News

As Cornell Finds Him Guilty of Academic Misconduct, Food Researcher Will Retire

Chronicle of Higher Education - September 20, 2018 - 1:11pm
Brian Wansink says his retirement has been “in the works for a long time,” but it comes as a university investigation takes him to task for “misreporting of research data, problematic statistical techniques,” and other violations.
Categories: Higher Education News

#RethinkSchool: Choice Matters for Military-Connected Students

U.S. Department of Education Blog | Ed.gov - September 20, 2018 - 11:32am

“There are so many active-duty military families today who are making decisions about how they advance within the military, or where they are going to live… based on educational opportunities for their children,” Secretary DeVos recently said in a conversation with Kay Coles James, president of the Heritage Foundation. “I think we have the opportunity to change the dynamic for them.”

Maddie Shick is from one such family – and, despite being a bright student, she faces challenges that accompany a military-connected lifestyle.  A self-proclaimed “professional new girl,” Maddie is now a sophomore at Robinson High School in Tampa, Florida.

Her formal education began in Georgia, but she’s learned across the country and around the world – even moving to Germany, where her father was deployed, for a year.

She’s attended a dozen different schools since preschool – and some of them have provided her with strong opportunities to learn and grow. As a middle school student in Columbus, Georgia, Maddie joined the drama club and performed in West Side Story. The school taught an International Baccalaureate curriculum.

Maddie Shick

The following year, the family moved to Fairbanks, Alaska, where Maddie had the opportunity to cross-country ski at school. She also joined the wrestling team – and she fell in love with the sport. “Girls can wrestle, too,” Maddie said.

But in Fairbanks, Maddie had to put her love of acting on hold: the school didn’t offer drama, and her family couldn’t find an active children’s theater group in the area.

And when the family next moved to Tampa, Florida, Maddie had to abandon her love of wrestling, too: when she switched schools within the district, she was disqualified from wrestling with her new team.

Maddie took advantage of the opportunity to explore new activities as she moved from school to school – but that also meant giving up ones that she’d once loved.

“There’s good and bad to all these schools,” Maddie said, “But the really bad part is that I don’t ever get to stay long enough to benefit from any one type of school.”

Military-connected students are often required to compromise – on top of the traditional pressures of maintaining good grades, preparing for tests, working, volunteering, and planning for life beyond high school.

Maddie with her family.

“Moving and starting over every two years makes all these pressures worse,” Maddie said. “Now, imagine you have to focus on all these things at three different schools, in three different states, in a four year period. It’s tough.”

Military-connected families deserve the opportunity to attend schools that work for them. They deserve – as the Secretary said – the flexibility to “customize their child’s education.”

That’s why the Secretary has called on all of America to fundamentally rethink school, including asking questions that were once considered “non-negotiable” or too difficult to answer. For example, students like Maddie are often required to fall in line with the pace of a new school – even if she’s ahead of her classmates.

“I was in gifted education for most of elementary school, but when we moved to Alaska I did not qualify for their program,” said Maddie. “Now, I don’t want to even try for gifted programs because I am tired of repeating all the testing every two years and most of the gifted programs are limited anyway.”

Military-connected students and all students should have options – perhaps attending a traditional public school for some classes, and attending an online or charter school for others. Rethinking school means that students, like Maddie, to whom “learning comes easy,” can advance quickly in subject areas that interest them.

“We do live an adventure,” Maddie said. “But some parts are really hard. School is one of them.”

Maddie deserves high-quality opportunities. She deserves the freedom to pursue subjects that interest and challenge her, in an environment that meets her needs.

All students, including those in military-connected families, should be free to learn, grow and thrive.

 

Continue the conversation on Facebook or Twitter.

Note: This is a post in our #RethinkSchool series. The series features innovative schools and stories from students, parents and educators highlighting efforts across the United States to rethink school. Check back on Thursdays for new posts in the series. The #RethinkSchool series presents examples of approaches schools, educators, families and others are using to rethink school in their individual and unique circumstances. Blog articles provide insights on the activities of schools, programs, grantees and other education stakeholders to promote continuing discussion of educational innovation and reform. The Department of Education does not endorse any educational product, service, curriculum or pedagogy.

The post #RethinkSchool: Choice Matters for Military-Connected Students appeared first on ED.gov Blog.

Categories: Higher Education News

What’s on the Mind of the Private-College President? 3 Insights From a New Report

Chronicle of Higher Education - September 20, 2018 - 2:55am
The Council of Independent Colleges took the pulse of campus leaders and found race, representation, and a hostile political climate among their concerns.
Categories: Higher Education News

U. of Tennessee Considers a Politically Connected Businessman to Run Its System

Chronicle of Higher Education - September 19, 2018 - 5:18pm
Randy Boyd doesn’t have experience in academe, but the scandal-plagued system could use “an outside-in perspective,” as the chair of the Board of Trustees put it.
Categories: Higher Education News

Journals Retract 6 More Articles by a Controversial Cornell Food Scientist

Chronicle of Higher Education - September 19, 2018 - 5:04pm
Brian Wansink called the latest retractions, which bring his total to more than a dozen, “very unjust.” Meanwhile, the university said its own investigation of the researcher is about to conclude.
Categories: Higher Education News

The Parent’s Guide to Filling Out the FAFSA® Form

U.S. Department of Education Blog | Ed.gov - September 19, 2018 - 12:31pm

While the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA®) form is the student’s application, we know that parents often play a large role in the process. After all, students who are considered dependent have to provide parental information on the FAFSA form anyway and must have a parent sign it. While we recommend that the student start his or her own FAFSA form, we know that’s not always what happens. With that in mind, we wanted to provide instructions for parents who are starting the FAFSA form on behalf of their child so you can avoid running into issues completing the form.

If you are a parent completing the FAFSA form for your child, follow these 8 steps:

1. Create an account (FSA ID)

An FSA ID is a username and password you use on Federal Student Aid websites such as fafsa.gov and StudentLoans.gov. If your child is considered a dependent student, two unique FSA IDs are needed to complete the FAFSA form online:

  1. Parent’s FSA ID
  2. Student’s FSA ID

We recommend that you and your child register for FSA IDs ahead of time, so you don’t experience delays later in the process.

IMPORTANT: Your child must create his or her own FSA ID. You cannot create an FSA ID for your child. Also, when you register, you’ll be asked to provide an email address and mobile phone number. This is optional but highly recommended. These two items must be unique to each account. In other words, your email address and mobile phone number cannot be associated with more than one FSA ID.

You and your child should create your FSA IDs now at StudentAid.gov/fsaid.

Your FSA ID serves as your legal electronic signature throughout the federal student aid process. Do not share your FSA ID with anyone, not even your child. Your child should also not share his or her FSA ID with you. Keep your FSA ID information in a safe place. You’ll need it to renew your FAFSA form each year and to access federal student aid information online.

2. Start the FAFSA® form at fafsa.gov
  • Go to fafsa.gov and click “Start Here” under the “New to FAFSA.gov?” heading.
  • Once on the log-in page, you will see two options. If you are starting the FAFSA form on behalf of your child, choose the option on the right, “I am a parent, preparer, or student from a Freely Associated State.”
  • Enter your child’s name, Social Security number, and date of birth. Then, click next.
  • Choose which FAFSA form you’d like to complete.
    2018–19 FAFSA form if your child will be attending college between July 1, 2018, and June 30, 2019. 2019–20 FAFSA form if your child will be attending college between July 1, 2019, and June 30, 2020. Both: If your child will be attending college during both time periods and hasn’t completed the 2018–19 FAFSA form yet, complete that first, wait until it processes (one to three days), then go back in and complete the 2019–20 FAFSA form after.
  • Were you given the option to submit a FAFSA® Renewal?
    If your child is present, you should choose this option. If you do, a lot of the demographic information required will be pre-populated. Your child must be present because he or she will need to enter the student’s FSA ID to continue. If your child is not present, you should select “Start NEW FAFSA.”
  • Create a save key. A save key is a temporary password that allows you and your child to “pass” the FAFSA form back and forth. It also allows you to save your child’s FAFSA form and return to it later. Once you create a save key, share it with your child. He or she will need it to complete later steps.
IMPORTANT TIPS
— The FAFSA® form is the student’s application, not yours.
When the FAFSA form says “you” or “your,” it’s referring to the student (unless otherwise noted).
— Avoid simultaneous logins.
Your child should not be filling out their FAFSA online at the same time you are. Your progress can be lost if they click “Save” at a different point in the application.
— If you need help:
Click on the blue question mark symbol at the corner of each question. 3. Fill out the Student Demographics section

After the introduction page, you will proceed to enter basic demographic information about your child, such as name, date of birth, etc. If you chose the FAFSA renewal option in step two, a lot of his or her personal information will be pre-populated to save you time. Make sure you enter your child’s personal information exactly as it appears on his or her Social Security card so you don’t encounter any errors. (That’s right, no nicknames.)

4. List the schools to which you want your FAFSA® information sent

In the School Selection section, you’ll add all the schools you want to receive your child’s information. It is important that you add every school your child is considering, even if he or she hasn’t applied or been accepted yet. It doesn’t hurt to add more schools; colleges can’t see the other schools that have been added. In fact, you don’t even have to remove schools if your child later decides not to apply or attend. If your child doesn’t end up applying or getting accepted to a school, the school can just disregard his or her FAFSA form. You can remove schools at any time to make room for new schools. You can add up to 10 schools at a time. If your child is applying to more than 10 schools, here’s what you should do.

5. Answer the dependency status questions

In this section, you’ll be asked a series of specific questions to determine whether or not your child is required to provide your (parent) information on the FAFSA form.

  • These dependency guidelines are set by Congress and are different from those used by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS).
  • Even if your child doesn’t live with you, supports him or herself, and files taxes separately from you, he or she may still be considered a dependent student for federal student aid purposes.
  • If your child is determined to be a dependent student, he or she will be required to report information about you. If your child is determined to be an independent student, you can skip the questions about providing parent information (unless otherwise noted by the school).
6. Fill out the Parent Demographics section

This is where you’ll provide your own demographic information. Are you divorced? Remarried? Below is a guide to determining which parent’s information needs to be included on your child’s FAFSA form. For specific guidance, review our “Reporting Parent Information” page.

7. Supply your financial information

This step is incredibly simple if you use the IRS Data Retrieval Tool (DRT). The IRS DRT allows you to import your IRS tax information into the FAFSA form with just a few clicks. Using this tool also may reduce the amount of paperwork you need to provide to your child’s school. So if you’re eligible, use it!

To access the tool, indicate that you’ve “already completed” taxes on the parent finances page. If you’re eligible, you’ll see an option to “Link to IRS.”

Next, you’ll likely be asked to provide your child’s financial information.

  • If your child filed taxes, the easiest way to complete this section is to use the IRS DRT. Your child would need to be present because he or she needs to provide his or her FSA ID to use the tool. If your child is not present, save and exit the application and instruct your child to log in with his or her FSA ID, retrieve the FAFSA form using the save key, and then use the IRS DRT to complete the FAFSA form and sign it.
  • If your child did not file taxes, you can enter his or her financial information manually (if you have access to the required information). If you don’t have access to the information, save and exit the application and instruct your child to log in with his or her FSA ID, retrieve the FAFSA form using the save key, complete the FAFSA form, and sign it.

NOTE: If you need to save and exit your child’s FAFSA form so he or she can complete the remaining information, you’ll need to log back in and sign your child’s FAFSA form before your child can submit it.

8. Sign your child’s FAFSA® form

Both you and your child need to sign the FAFSA form. The quickest and easiest way to sign your child’s FAFSA form is online with your FSA ID.

If your child is not present, here’s what you do:

  1. Sign your child’s FAFSA form with your FSA ID first.
  2. Save and exit the application.
  3. Instruct your child to log in using their FSA ID and sign the FAFSA form.

Sign and Submit Tips:

  • If you or your child forgot your FSA ID, you can retrieve it.
  • Make sure you and your child don’t mix up your FSA IDs. This is one of the most common errors we see, and why it’s extremely important for each person to create his/her own FSA ID and not share it with anyone.
  • Make sure the parent who is using his/her FSA ID to sign the FAFSA form chooses the right parent number. If you don’t remember whether you were listed as Parent 1 or Parent 2, you can go back to the parent demographics section to check.

  • If you get an error saying that your FSA ID information doesn’t match the information provided on the FAFSA form, here’s what you should do. Note: This is often the result of mixing up the student and parent FSA ID.
  • We recommend signing the FAFSA form with an FSA ID because it’s the fastest way to get your child’s FAFSA form processed. However, if you and/or your child are unable to sign the FAFSA form electronically with an FSA ID, you can mail in a signature page. From the sign and submit page, select “Other options to sign and submit” and then choose “Print A Signature Page.” Just keep in mind that your child’s FAFSA form will take longer to process if you go this route.
  • If you have multiple children who need to complete the FAFSA form, you can use the same FSA ID to sign FAFSA forms for all of your children. You can also transfer your information into your other children’s applications by choosing the option provided on the FAFSA confirmation page.

Congrats you’re finished!

Your child is one step closer to getting money for college. With the hard part over, learn what your child should do next after submitting the FAFSA form.

Nicole Callahan is a Digital Engagement Strategist at the U.S. Department of Education’s office of Federal Student Aid.

Continue the conversation on Facebook or Twitter.

The post The Parent’s Guide to Filling Out the FAFSA® Form appeared first on ED.gov Blog.

Categories: Higher Education News

How Notre Dame Rethought Its Core Curriculum

Chronicle of Higher Education - September 19, 2018 - 11:55am
The university recategorized core courses into “ways of knowing” and added flexibility to its requirements.
Categories: Higher Education News

U. of Pennsylvania Says It Will Be First Ivy to Offer Online Bachelor’s Degree

Chronicle of Higher Education - September 18, 2018 - 8:05pm
The program, aimed at nontraditional students, illustrates the growing credibility and popularity of online education.
Categories: Higher Education News

‘We Are the Most At-Risk People on Campus.’ Non-Tenured Instructors Can Now Serve in U. of Mississippi’s Faculty Senate.

Chronicle of Higher Education - September 18, 2018 - 5:10pm
At many colleges, non-tenure-track professors can advocate as faculty senators for issues that affect them. But not at the University of Mississippi, until now.
Categories: Higher Education News

Women Say Her Husband Harassed. Now She’s Under Fire.

Chronicle of Higher Education - September 18, 2018 - 4:07pm
As sexual-harassment allegations mount against the husband of the University of Wisconsin at Whitewater’s chancellor, women are saying the chancellor failed them and must resign. A former graduate student makes new accusations.
Categories: Higher Education News

11 Common FAFSA® Mistakes

U.S. Department of Education Blog | Ed.gov - September 18, 2018 - 2:14pm

The 2019–20 FAFSA® will be available October 1! If you plan to attend college between July 1, 2019, and June 30, 2020, you should fill out your FAFSA form as soon as possible!

Just make sure you don’t make one of these common mistakes:

1. Not Completing the FAFSA Form

We hear all kinds of reasons: “The FAFSA form is too hard.” “It takes too long to complete.” “I’ll never qualify anyway, so why does it matter?” It does matter. For one, contrary to popular belief, there is no income “cut-off” when it comes to federal student aid. Also, the FAFSA form is not just the application for “free money” such as the Federal Pell Grant, it’s also the application for Federal Work-Study funds, federal student loans, and even scholarships and grants offered by your state, school, or private organization. If you don’t complete the FAFSA form, you could lose out on thousands of dollars to help you pay for college. It doesn’t take too much time to complete, and there is help text provided for every question.

2. Not Filling Out the FAFSA Form as Soon as It’s Available

If you want to get the most financial aid possible, fill out the FAFSA form ASAP. Some financial aid is awarded on a first-come, first-served basis, and some states and colleges run out of money early.  Even if it seems like your school’s deadline is far off in the future, get your FAFSA form done ASAP. The 2019–20 FAFSA form requires 2017 tax information, which you should already have—so there’s no excuse to wait!

3. Not Filing the FAFSA Form by the Deadline

You should fill out the FAFSA form as soon as possible, but you should DEFINITELY fill it out before your earliest FAFSA deadline. Each state and school sets its own deadline, and some deadlines are very early. To be sure you are being considered for the maximum amount of financial aid, fill out your FAFSA form—and any other financial aid applications required by your state or school—before the earliest deadline.

4. Not Getting an FSA ID Before Filling Out the FAFSA Form

It’s important to get an FSA ID before filling out the FAFSA form. Why? Well, because when you register for an FSA ID, you may need to wait up to three days before you can use it to sign your FAFSA form electronically. An FSA ID is a username and password that you use to log in to certain U.S. Department of Education websites, including fafsa.gov. You AND your parent (if you’re considered a dependent student) will each need your own, separate FSA IDs if you both want to sign your FAFSA form online. DO NOT share your FSA IDs with each other! Doing so could cause problems or delays with your financial aid. Don’t wait! Create an FSA ID now: StudentAid.gov/fsaid.

5. Not Using Your FSA ID to Start the FAFSA Form

When you begin your FAFSA form, you will be asked to identify yourself as one of these:

1.) I am the student
2.) I am a parent, preparer, or student from a Freely Associated State

If you’re the student, you should choose the first option. Why? When you do, some of your personal information (name, Social Security number, date of birth, etc.) will be automatically loaded into your application.  This will prevent you from running into a common error that occurs when your verified FSA ID information doesn’t match the information on your FAFSA form. Also, you won’t have to enter your FSA ID again to transfer your information from the IRS or to sign your FAFSA form electronically.

6. Not Using the IRS Data Retrieval Tool (IRS DRT)

For many applicants, the most difficult part about filling out the FAFSA form is entering the financial information. But thanks to a partnership with the IRS, students and parents who are eligible can automatically transfer their necessary 2017 tax information into the 2019–20 FAFSA form using the IRS DRT. It’s the fastest, most accurate way to enter your tax return information into the FAFSA form, so if you’re given the option to “LINK TO IRS” button, take advantage of it!

7. Not Reading Definitions Carefully

When it comes to completing the FAFSA form, you’ll want to read each definition and each question carefully; sometimes the FAFSA form is looking for very specific information that may not be obvious.

Here are some items that have very specific (but not necessarily intuitive) definitions according to the FAFSA:

  • Legal guardianship
    To determine your dependency status, the FAFSA form asks, “Does someone other than your parent or stepparent have legal guardianship of you, as determined by a court in your state of legal residence?” Many students incorrectly answer “yes” here. For this question, the definition of legal guardianship does not include your parents—even if they were appointed by a court to be your guardians. Also, you cannot be your own legal guardian.

  • Number of family members (household size)
    The FAFSA form has a specific definition of how your household size or your parents’ household size should be determined. Read the instructions carefully. Many students incorrectly report this number, especially when the student doesn’t physically live with the parent.
  • Number of family members in college
    Enter the number of people in your (or your parents’) household who will attend college at the same time as you. Don’t forget to include yourself, but don’t include your parents in this number, even if they’re in college. This number should never be greater than your number of family members.
  • Taxable college grants and scholarships
    For this question, you report only college grant and scholarship amounts that were reported to the IRS as income. That means you should not use the amount listed on your 1098-T; you should report the amount listed on your tax return. Do not use the number in the adjusted gross income (AGI) field. Here are the tax line numbers you should reference when asked this question. If you didn’t file taxes, you should enter zero.

* If you’re a dependent student, the value of any college savings accounts should be reported as a parent asset, not a student asset.

 

8. Inputting Incorrect Information

Here are some examples of common errors we see when people complete the FAFSA form:

  • Confusing parent information with student information
    We know there are many parents out there who fill out the FAFSA form for their children, but remember, it is the student’s application. When the FAFSA form says “you” or “your,” it’s referring to the student, so make sure to enter your (the student’s) information. If the form is asking for your parent’s information, it will specify that in the question.
  • Entering information that doesn’t match your FSA ID information
    After you create an FSA ID, your information (name, Social Security number (SSN), date of birth) is sent to the Social Security Administration to be verified. If you then enter a different name, SSN, and/or date of birth on the FAFSA form, you’ll receive an error message. This is often the result of a typo or mixing up student information and parent information. To avoid delays, triple-check that you have entered your information correctly. If you encounter an error about information not matching, here’s how you can resolve it.
9. Not Reporting Required Information
  • Additional financial information
    If you follow our recommendation and use the IRS DRT, a lot of the financial information required on the FAFSA form will be automatically filled in for you. However, the IRS DRT doesn’t populate everything; some numbers, including many items in the “Additional Financial Information” section, must be manually entered. If you used the IRS DRT, you’ll see that some boxes in that section are pre-checked and the fields prefilled with “Transferred from the IRS.” However, other items, such as “Payments to tax-deferred pension and retirement savings plans” and others, cannot be transferred from the IRS. You must manually review each item in the list, check the box if it applies to you, and enter the appropriate amount by referencing your relevant financial records. In the case of payments to tax-deferred pension and retirement savings plans, you can find that information on your W-2 form.

10. Listing only one college

Unless you are applying to only one college or already know where you’re going to school, you should include more than one. Colleges can’t see the other schools you’ve added, so you should add ALL colleges you are considering to your FAFSA form, even if you aren’t sure whether you’ll apply or be accepted. You can add up to 10 schools at a time. If you’re applying to more than 10 schools, follow these steps.

It doesn’t hurt your application to add more schools. In fact, you don’t even have to remove schools you later decide not to apply to. If you don’t end up applying or getting accepted to a school, the school can just disregard your FAFSA form. But you can remove schools at any time to make room for new schools.

NOTE:  If you’re a resident of certain states, the order in which you list the schools on your FAFSA form might matter. Find out whether your state has a requirement for the order in which you list schools on your FAFSA form.

11. Not Signing the FAFSA Form

So many students answer every single question that is asked but fail to actually sign the FAFSA form with their FSA ID and submit it. This happens for many reasons—maybe you forgot your FSA ID, or your parent isn’t with you to sign with the parent FSA ID—so your application is left incomplete. Don’t let this happen to you.

  • If you don’t know your FSA ID, select “Forgot username” and/or “Forgot password.”
  • If you don’t have an FSA ID, create one.

If you’re not able to sign with your FSA ID, there’s an option to mail a signature page. If you would like confirmation that your FAFSA form has been submitted, you can check your status immediately after you submit your FAFSA form online.

Nicole Callahan is a Digital Engagement Strategist at Federal Student Aid.

Continue the conversation on Facebook or Twitter.

The post 11 Common FAFSA® Mistakes appeared first on ED.gov Blog.

Categories: Higher Education News

U. of Michigan Professor Refuses to Recommend Student Whose Destination Is Israel

Chronicle of Higher Education - September 18, 2018 - 2:12pm
His university, however, says the scholar’s personal politics are out of place.
Categories: Higher Education News

Professor Refuses to Recommend Student Whose Destination Is Israel

Chronicle of Higher Education - September 18, 2018 - 2:12pm
His university, however, says the scholar’s personal politics are out of place.
Categories: Higher Education News

Idea Lab: Faculty Diversity

Chronicle of Higher Education - September 18, 2018 - 11:56am
Colleges are facing growing demands by students to hire more minority faculty members. But doing so requires revamping how search committees usually operate, confronting unconscious bias, and improving the Ph.D. pipeline of future professors. And recruitment is only the first step. Colleges also have to focus on retaining minority professors and examining the policies and practices that may make them feel underappreciated. This collection of articles examines how colleges are changing to bolst...
Categories: Higher Education News

U. of Wisconsin System Opens Second Investigation Into Alleged Harassment by Chancellor’s Husband

Chronicle of Higher Education - September 18, 2018 - 11:41am
He was banned from the Whitewater campus after he was found to have sexually harassed female employees. Now another woman has accused him of harassing her when she was a student-government leader.
Categories: Higher Education News

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