Higher Education News

U. of Rochester’s President Resigns as Report Supports Handling of Harassment Case

Chronicle of Higher Education - January 11, 2018 - 3:01pm
A professor’s behavior toward women was sometimes inappropriate but didn’t violate either campus policy at the time or federal law, an investigator concluded.
Categories: Higher Education News

Former Columbia U. Financial-Aid Director Is Accused of Taking Hundreds of Thousands in Kickbacks

Chronicle of Higher Education - January 11, 2018 - 2:20pm
The ex-administrator and three former students from the Teachers College are facing conspiracy and bribery charges.
Categories: Higher Education News

Calling Local Heroes Directly into Action; Apply to be an ED School Ambassador Fellow

U.S. Department of Education Blog - January 11, 2018 - 1:42pm

“But I’m just a teacher…”

We, teachers, change the mindsets of self-doubters, instill a lifelong love of learning for many, care for the children of others as if they’re our own, and play a major role in creating all other professions. Yet, despite those superpowers, many of us have heard or uttered the phrase ourselves, “But I’m just a teacher,” when we’ve been encouraged to pursue leadership opportunities beyond our classrooms, schools or districts.

I’ll confess that I’ve used that phrase at various points during my career as an educator. While it might be difficult to determine why educators are often less confident in the value of their input, the self-doubt is real.

Perhaps it’s the perception that major policy decisions impacting students and schools often occur with minimum input from teachers. Maybe it’s the manner in which social media has a way of amplifying the most critical voices in any topic, including education. Or, perhaps teachers are feeling overwhelmed and fatigued from being frequent targets of criticism for issues beyond their control.

Regardless of the reasons, the voices of dedicated, creative, and solution-focused educators are often overlooked on issues that impact how they do their jobs and serve children.

Special Opportunity for Educator Input

As I’ve gained opportunities over the years to interact with individuals at the state and federal level concerning education issues, I’ve seen the importance of being in the position to share the stories of those who might not have the ability or opportunity to speak out concerning their interests. The Department of Education values and needs the input of those who interact with students on a daily basis. The School Ambassador Fellowship Program is unique because it gives teachers, counselors, librarians and other school leaders the opportunity to provide input and feedback on policy matters that impact their schools and communities.

Although Fellows will have differing goals and interests, the opportunity to hone leadership skills is a universal aspect of the program. I’ve been fortunate to work in numerous contexts as an educator – from preschool to teaching university students. Those experiences have been gratifying. Nevertheless, I’ve always questioned the lack of diversity in our teacher corps. Simply stated, there aren’t enough Black men leading our classrooms.

James Ford, Nathan Gibbs-Bowling, Abdul Wright & Kevin Dua – State Teachers of the Year for NC, WA, MN and MA – discuss their journeys as Black male educators.

Although I’ve had numerous wonderful experiences thus far as a Fellow, it has been extremely rewarding to do work supporting others who also have a desire to increase our percentage of Black male educators. Whether through work as a Teach to Lead critical friend, or as a presenter at the inaugural convening of Black Male Educators for Social Justice, the ability to develop my leadership skills while addressing that topic (and others) has been extremely rewarding. Other Fellows have addressed areas that represent their interests in education, like special education and career readiness.

Elephant in the Room

Let’s be honest. For any number of reasons you might feel that applying to represent teachers on behalf of the Department of Education is just something you don’t feel you can do. And, if your primary reason for applying to the Fellowship is based exclusively on how you feel about issues, it might be best to pursue other opportunities where you can impact our field. However, if you desire to be a voice for the students and families you support at the national level, consider applying. For me, the best time to be a true advocate for my students and my families is, always, right now.

There were 6 Fellows selected for the 2017-2018 cohort. Does that mean you have to be the BEST at something in order to be selected? Not necessarily.

Must you be creative, passionate and eager to contribute to conversations around improving the outcomes of all students? Absolutely!

Most teachers have those skills and many more to spare. They’re our local heroes. What’s your superpower? More importantly, are you willing to share it?

Apply to be a School Ambassador Fellow for the 2018-19 school year through January 31, 2018.

 

Elmer Harris is a 2017-18 School Ambassador Fellow at the U.S. Department of Education.

The post Calling Local Heroes Directly into Action; Apply to be an ED School Ambassador Fellow appeared first on ED.gov Blog.

Categories: Higher Education News

University Presidents Call on Congress to Find 'Narrowly Tailored Solution' for Dreamers

Chronicle of Higher Education - January 11, 2018 - 11:02am
The letter comes as the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program nears the date at which it will be rescinded, absent action from the U.S. Congress.
Categories: Higher Education News

Offspring of Purdue’s Controversial Kaplan Purchase Now Has a Name

Chronicle of Higher Education - January 11, 2018 - 9:23am
The public university's embrace of the for-profit institution has worried some faculty and students since news of the deal broke in April. 
Categories: Higher Education News

Why You Should Ask Students to Help Design Courses

Chronicle of Higher Education - January 11, 2018 - 8:11am
Helping put a course together can be a deep learning experience for students -- and provide professors with fresh ideas.
Categories: Higher Education News

Why Is a College-Admissions Code of Ethics Such a Big Deal?

Chronicle of Higher Education - January 10, 2018 - 8:01pm
Following news that the U.S. Justice Department is investigating an admissions association’s new ethics code, professionals in the field weigh the document’s intentions and shortcomings.
Categories: Higher Education News

La Lucha Para Reconstruir Una Universidad Devastada

Chronicle of Higher Education - January 10, 2018 - 6:00pm
Cuando el huracán María sumió a la Universidad de Puerto Rico en la penumbra, los profesores y estudiantes no tuvieron más remedio que volver a iluminarse.  
Categories: Higher Education News

What One Reporter Saw in a University's Devastation

Chronicle of Higher Education - January 10, 2018 - 1:55pm
Laid low by Hurricane Maria, students at the University of Puerto Rico did what has always been required of islanders: They improvised.
Categories: Higher Education News

“The Spirit is There”

U.S. Department of Education Blog - January 10, 2018 - 1:32pm


“When can I go back to school?”

When that experience is disrupted, getting back to school can mean everything to students. And the adults who care for them — parents, educators and civic leaders — feel a special urgency.

For our fellow Americans in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, including more than 410,000 students in grades K-12, the 2017 hurricane season severely disrupted those reliable routines. First Irma hit, leaving more than one million people — nearly a third of the population on an island the size of Connecticut — without power. Two weeks later, María followed: one meteorologist likened its impact to a tornado, 50 miles wide, cutting a path of devastation through cities, towns and countryside.

In a three-week period, I travelled twice to visit Puerto Rico — the second time with U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

We wanted to see conditions on the ground in the aftermath of the worst storm to hit the island in nearly a century, and provide support to the Puerto Rico Department of Education in its efforts to rebuild.

Since Irma and María slammed the region, our Department team has been in near-daily contact with local officials, coordinating closely with other federal and relief agencies. We’ve provided technical assistance and waived burdensome regulations that would increase costs and slow down recovery. We’ve provided an initial grant and are working with the White House and Congress to provide much greater emergency funding.

We’ve sent staff — thus far, dispatching ten Department employees on temporary assignment to support revitalization efforts in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

Still, we knew we needed to learn firsthand how the Federal government, with a host of national, State, local and charitable organizations, can best help the people of Puerto Rico get back to school, get back to normal and emerge stronger than before the storms.

Read more about Acting Assistant Secretary Botel’s visits to Puerto Rico on Medium

 

Jason Botel is Acting U.S. Assistant Secretary for Elementary and Secondary Education

The post “The Spirit is There” appeared first on ED.gov Blog.

Categories: Higher Education News

In New Budget Proposal, California Higher Ed Gets Modest Funding and a Big Online College

Chronicle of Higher Education - January 10, 2018 - 1:30pm
Increases in support for public colleges were small. But one thing Gov. Jerry Brown is willing to spend more money on is a fully online community college.
Categories: Higher Education News

A ‘Historian of Charisma’ Explains Why Oprah Could Be President

Chronicle of Higher Education - January 9, 2018 - 6:08pm
The emotional neediness of American voters has shaped the last 140 years of history, according to Jeremy Young, an assistant professor of history at Dixie State U. And that’s not going to change.
Categories: Higher Education News

‘Captured by the Interests It’s Supposed to Regulate’: A Whistle-Blower’s Grim Assessment of the Ed. Dept.

Chronicle of Higher Education - January 9, 2018 - 4:15pm
It took Jon H. Oberg, a determined federal bureaucrat, more than a decade of work to claw back one-tenth of the money student-loan providers had claimed using an accounting loophole. Here Mr. Oberg provides the fullest account of the saga — and the lessons he drew from it.
Categories: Higher Education News

VA Backs Off Threat to Cut GI Bill Funding for Ashford University

Chronicle of Higher Education - January 9, 2018 - 4:03pm
The for-profit institution will continue to receive millions in federal dollars that it may or may not be eligible for.
Categories: Higher Education News

I 'Crushed' My Student Loans in Record Time. (Free Rent Helped)

Chronicle of Higher Education - January 9, 2018 - 3:52pm
Tales of rapidly paying off enormous amounts of student debt are popular on the internet, but many borrowers don't have the advantages to blast away loans. 
Categories: Higher Education News

I Crushed My Student Loans in Record Time. (Free Rent Helped)

Chronicle of Higher Education - January 9, 2018 - 3:52pm
Tales of rapidly paying off enormous amounts of student debt are popular on the internet, but many borrowers don't have the advantages to blast away loans. 
Categories: Higher Education News

Berkeley Breaks Silence on Arrest of Undocumented Student

Chronicle of Higher Education - January 8, 2018 - 3:51pm
Carol Christ, chancellor of the University of California's flagship campus, said in a statement that administrators are "taking all appropriate actions" so that Luis Mora can eventually continue his coursework. 
Categories: Higher Education News

Need to Know What the Free-Speech Wars Mean for Faculty?

Chronicle of Higher Education - January 8, 2018 - 3:34pm
In a time of political tensions, the stakes are high. Read a collection of Chronicle articles on why professors end up in the political cross-hairs — and what their colleges can do about it.
Categories: Higher Education News

After Pledge's Death, Fraternity Is Banned for 10 Years in Pennsylvania

Chronicle of Higher Education - January 8, 2018 - 12:28pm
The hazing incident involved a pledge in an Asian-American fraternity being brutally beaten in the Pocono Mountains.
Categories: Higher Education News

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