Higher Education News

At Illinois College, a Fellowship Helps Students Succeed

Chronicle of Higher Education - May 17, 2015 - 10:00pm

The program begins with a summer session for incoming freshmen and continues with special classes and social opportunities.

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Mentors Matter

Chronicle of Higher Education - May 17, 2015 - 10:00pm

The ability to overcome challenges is often framed as individual achievement when it’s anything but.

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7 Ways to Attract Diverse Students to Study Abroad

Chronicle of Higher Education - May 17, 2015 - 10:00pm

Aaron Bruce thinks such programs could be more sensitive to low-income and other students who haven't traveled much.

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Video: At Sweet Briar, a Bittersweet Commencement

Chronicle of Higher Education - May 17, 2015 - 9:02am

Sadness tinges the joy of graduating seniors at what is likely to be the last graduation day at the Virginia women's college. 

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Chronicle Videos

Chronicle of Higher Education - May 15, 2015 - 10:00am

Short films and interviews focused on higher education.

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Bullying Rates Drop

U.S. Department of Education Blog - May 15, 2015 - 7:00am

Bullying remains a serious issue for students and their families, and efforts to reduce bullying concern policy makers, administrators, and educators. According to U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, “As schools become safer, students are better able to thrive academically and socially. The Department, along with our federal partners and others, has been deeply involved in the fight against bullying in our nation’s schools.” This is why we are so pleased to share that, after remaining virtually unchanged for close to a decade, new data indicate that the prevalence of bullying is at a record low.

According to the U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics latest School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the National Crime Victimization Survey, in 2013, the reported prevalence of bullying among students ages 12 to 18 dropped to 22 percent after remaining stubbornly around 28 percent since 2005.

“The report brings welcome news,” U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Sylvia M. Burwell said.  “Parents, teachers, health providers, community members and young people are clearly making a difference by taking action and sending the message that bullying is not acceptable. We will continue to do our part at HHS to help ensure every child has the opportunity to live, learn and grow in a community free of bullying.”

Bullying can occur anywhere and to any student. There are three types of bullying: physical, relational (or social) and verbal. Research shows that students who are bullied are more likely to struggle in school and skip class. They are more likely to abuse drugs and alcohol, be depressed, and are at higher risk of suicide.

Since 2010, the Department of Education along with the Departments of Health and Human Services and Justice, have acted to combat bullying and cyberbullying through work such as StopBullying.gov. However, it is the work of educators, bus drivers, parents, and students, that have taken a stand to put an end to bullying. Your hard work and dedication is making a difference!

To learn about bullying and how to take action to end bullying, please visit StopBullying.gov and join the conversation on the StopBullying.gov Facebook page!

Sarah Sisaye is a Management and Program Analyst in the Office of Elementary and Secondary Education

Categories: Higher Education News

Company Behind Online 2-Year College Sues the Accreditor That Shut It Down

Chronicle of Higher Education - May 15, 2015 - 2:56am

Ivy Bridge Education accuses the Higher Learning Commission of conducting a "witch hunt" against nontraditional education providers.

Categories: Higher Education News

How a White Historian Nurtures Diverse Ph.D.’s

Chronicle of Higher Education - May 15, 2015 - 2:55am

Virginia Yans, of Rutgers University, talks about her enjoyment in working with candidates from a range of backgrounds.

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How Ending the Two-Tiered Student-Loan System Would Help Struggling Borrowers

Chronicle of Higher Education - May 15, 2015 - 2:55am

The bank-based lending system is being phased out, but millions of students have seen their default problems exacerbated by steep collection costs.

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Colleges Strive to Meet Demand for a More Hands-On Education

Chronicle of Higher Education - May 15, 2015 - 2:55am

The University of Georgia and others are making experiential learning central to their curricula.

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Duncan Highlights Grad Rate, Calls for More Action

U.S. Department of Education Blog - May 14, 2015 - 9:47am

Secretary Duncan sat down for a conversation with America’s Promise Alliance’s president and CEO, John Gomperts, Tuesday to talk about the state of education in the country. The conversation came on the heels of the APA’s release of the Building on a Grad Nation report that both highlighted the record high school graduation rate at 81.4 percent and indicated the nation remained on pace to meet the organization’s goal of 90 percent on-time graduation by 2020.

While Duncan celebrated the promising gains in the graduation rate—particularly among students of color—he called for more action to not only improve graduation rates, but to ensure that those who graduate are truly ready for college and career. “This is not mission accomplished,” he said. “This is not the promised land.”

Making sure students today are college and career ready is the real measuring stick for success in today’s knowledge-based economy – not just getting a high school diploma. If a student shows up to college in need of remedial courses, then we as a nation still have much work to do.

“While we should be encouraged by projections like the one in this year’s Grad Nation report, we know that more hard work remains to truly prepare all—not just some—students for success in college, careers and life. Education must be the equalizer that can help overcome the odds stacked against too many of our students,” Duncan said during the event.

Duncan argued that a reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) is necessary if we are to fulfill the right of all children to have a real opportunity to succeed.

We must “work with huge urgency, honesty, and humility,” Duncan said, if we are going to ensure that our nation, that is for the first time majority minority, continues to show progress that ensures all kids get the opportunity to succeed.

Patrick Kerr is a member of the Communications Development division in the Office of Communications and Outreach.

Categories: Higher Education News

Supporting and Empowering Male Educators of Color

U.S. Department of Education Blog - May 14, 2015 - 6:30am

The Male Educators of Color Symposium convened May 8, 2015 at the U.S. Department of Education (photo by Leslie Williams/U.S. Department of Education)

Male educators of color are seldom recognized for our expertise in the engine that drives this country. But through the Male Educators of Color Symposium, the U.S. Department of Education shined a light on the work of the nation’s most underrepresented educators in preK-12 schools. At this gathering, some 150 plus men of various minority races discussed issues of policy, teacher mentorship, recruitment, cultural competency, and our roles in modern education.

Although collectively we comprise a very small percentage of the teaching force, our skills and dedication to the craft were largely represented at the symposium. Men traveled from as far as Hawaii to engage in the pre-planning of a significant step into changing the face of schools around the continental states.

Repairing the often-disparaging images of minorities was the crux of the conversation. In districts where large numbers of schools have students with teachers who do not look like them or lack cultural competence, we found higher rates of suspensions. We also found that minority male teachers in these schools often feel ostracized, over-worked, or idolized as disciplinarians. We brainstormed how to edify isolated minority male teachers and how to provide effective trainings on cultural awareness. We focused on enhancing cultural awareness and increasing the recruitment of minority male teachers.

Secretary of Education Arne Duncan shared remarks of empowerment and provided goals for moving forward. Said Duncan, “We have to figure out how to move beyond islands of success stories to creating systems where academic success is the norm and young people have the mentors, role models, and support they need to be successful.” He added that the Department of Education accepts the charge to help create solutions. “If we are not creating real, radical change, not incremental change around the margins, then we are part of the problem.”

The Male Educator of Color Symposium pushed some of these margins apart by helping to unify America’s minority male educators. This was a fundamental shift from the typical conversation in our school districts. We responded to a call to action for the elevation of schools and the profession. Attending the Department of Education’s Male Educator of Color Symposium was an inspiring way to end Teacher Appreciation Week.

Gary Hamilton grew up in the Dallas Independent School District, and is now a 5th grade special education teacher at Wheatley Education Campus in Washington, D.C. He has been teaching for 9 years. Gary is an America Achieves Fellow and a Teacher Selection Ambassador for the District of Columbia Public Schools.

Categories: Higher Education News

Meet a Trustee Who Serves 2 Masters: a Small Liberal-Arts College and a Sprawling University System

Chronicle of Higher Education - May 14, 2015 - 2:56am

A board member who serves at both a small college and a large university system says their gap in size isn't as important as you might think.

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As Concern Over Student-Loan Servicers Grows, a Watchdog Steps Up Scrutiny

Chronicle of Higher Education - May 14, 2015 - 2:55am

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, which has been monitoring the companies since last March, will seek more information on how they are serving borrowers.

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A Wave of Hispanic Students Reshapes a Historically Black College

Chronicle of Higher Education - May 14, 2015 - 2:55am

In Texas, Huston-Tillotson University and its peers look to protect their identities while courting a booming Latino population.

Categories: Higher Education News

A Historically Black University Embraces an International Future

Chronicle of Higher Education - May 14, 2015 - 2:55am

Delaware State University has expanded beyond its traditional African-American student population by attracting more students from China and around the world.

Categories: Higher Education News

2 Key Problems for Fracking Research: Not Enough Disclosure, Not Enough Financing

Chronicle of Higher Education - May 13, 2015 - 2:55am

Two recent studies of the controversial oil-recovery technique drew funding from sources with a clear interest in the results. Experts say that demonstrates difficulties.

Categories: Higher Education News

AAUP Blasts U. of Southern Maine and Felician College for Handling of Faculty Layoffs

Chronicle of Higher Education - May 13, 2015 - 2:55am

The professors’ association says both the public university and the Roman Catholic college trampled faculty rights in making unnecessary job cuts.

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LSU Chancellor Fights Budget Cuts With Candor and Swagger

Chronicle of Higher Education - May 13, 2015 - 2:55am

F. King Alexander is gaining a reputation as an outspoken advocate of higher education — even when that means facing off with conservative politicians.

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