Higher Education News

New Presidents for 2 Catholic Universities

Chronicle of Higher Education - February 22, 2015 - 10:01pm

James T. Harris III will lead the University of San Diego, and Colleen M. Hanycz will be the first woman to lead La Salle University.

Categories: Higher Education News

Why Just Filling the Pipeline Won't Diversify STEM Fields

Chronicle of Higher Education - February 22, 2015 - 10:01pm

Members of underrepresented minorities are likelier to step away from academe even after earning Ph.D.'s, research shows.

Categories: Higher Education News

Classicists Crunch Data to Test Hypotheses About Greece

Chronicle of Higher Education - February 22, 2015 - 10:01pm

At Stanford, scholars turn the tools of modern social science toward the study of life in ancient Greece.

Categories: Higher Education News

New Director Takes Over at Nixon Library; and Other News About People

Chronicle of Higher Education - February 22, 2015 - 10:01pm

Michael D. Ellzey has leadership experience in the public and private sector, but he is neither a historian nor an archivist.

Categories: Higher Education News

How Liberty U. Became an Unexpected Model for the Future of Higher Ed

Chronicle of Higher Education - February 22, 2015 - 10:01pm

The Rev. Jerry Falwell’s experiment is getting harder to ignore.

Categories: Higher Education News

Highlighting Success in Delaware

U.S. Department of Education Blog - February 20, 2015 - 1:25pm

Students at Howard High School of Technology. (Official Department of Education Photo by Joshua Hoover)

Secretary Arne Duncan made several stops in Delaware yesterday to get a firsthand look at the incredible progress made in education throughout the state. Delaware’s graduation rate has gone up, and dropout rates are at a 30-year low. The state is also making huge investments in early education and has emerged as a national leader in making college more affordable for everyone.

His first stop was at Howard High School of Technology in Wilmington, a school that was really struggling when he visited the school with Vice President Biden four years ago. But thanks to key reforms put in place since then, the school has made significant strides. While acknowledging the school’s accomplishments, he underscored the need to keep moving forward.

“Long way to go, no one’s putting up a huge ‘mission accomplished’ banner, but… as I’ve seen in schools as I’ve traveled the nation, schools that historically have struggled, have seen significant turnarounds in a relatively short period of time,” he said.

While there, he met with Governor Jack Markell, Education Secretary Mark Murphy, and a group of teachers who are leading key efforts at their schools to transition to higher standards and better assessments.

Other stops included a visit to the Rotary Club in Wilmington, and a stop at Delaware Technical Community College in Stanton with Labor Secretary Tom Perez for a roundtable discussion with students and business leaders and a conversation about the President’s proposal to make two years of community college free for responsible students.

The trip was both an affirmation of the hard work being done, but also an opportunity to remind stakeholders that there is still much left to do. While recognizing the many challenges that come with implementing big and bold changes to education (such as college and career readiness), he strongly urged educators to persevere.

“The lessons here are really profound, and the progress is fantastic, but what happens here, I think has national implications,” he said.

Patrick Kerr is a member of the Communications Development division in the Office of Communications and Outreach

Categories: Higher Education News

Can Dartmouth Rehabilitate Itself?

Chronicle of Higher Education - February 20, 2015 - 2:55am

Banning hard liquor, the college reckons with its culture.

Categories: Higher Education News

Concealed Handguns Mainly Miss the Mark as an Answer to Campus Rape

Chronicle of Higher Education - February 20, 2015 - 2:55am

Gun-rights advocates are pushing "campus carry" laws as a means to prevent sexual assaults, but the circumstances surrounding most attacks would preclude an armed defense.

Categories: Higher Education News

Campus Police Forces Use ‘Special-Victims Units’ to Aid Sex-Assault Victims

Chronicle of Higher Education - February 20, 2015 - 2:55am

The teams of specially trained officers could become more important as colleges face mounting pressure from activists and lawmakers.

Categories: Higher Education News

Download a Special Report: Alcohol's Hold on Campus

Chronicle of Higher Education - February 20, 2015 - 2:55am

Alcohol is an entrenched reality of campus life. Read and share this collection of articles on college drinking to inform colleagues and campus discussions.

Categories: Higher Education News

A Q&A With the Nevada Lawmaker Who Says Guns Will Help Prevent Campus Rape

Chronicle of Higher Education - February 20, 2015 - 2:55am

Michele Fiore explains why she thinks allowing "concealed carry" at colleges would thwart would-be attackers.

Categories: Higher Education News

What Happened When The Chronicle Sat Down With Steve Jobs Back in 1998

Chronicle of Higher Education - February 20, 2015 - 2:55am

His company on the ropes, the famously cagey founder of Apple gave some hints about his strategy to win a bigger share of the higher-education computer market.

Categories: Higher Education News

Let’s Get Every Kid in a Park

U.S. Department of Education Blog - February 19, 2015 - 2:26pm

Cross-posted from the White House blog.

From sea to shining sea, our country is home to gorgeous landscapes, vibrant waterways, and historic treasures that all Americans can enjoy. But right now, young people are spending more time in front of screens than outside, and that means they are missing out on valuable opportunities to explore, learn, and play in the spectacular outdoor places that belong to all of them.

President Obama is committed to giving every kid the chance to explore America’s great outdoors and unique history. That’s why today he launched the Every Kid in a Park initiative, which calls on each of our agencies to help get all children to visit and enjoy the outdoors and inspire a new generation of Americans to experience their country’s unrivaled public lands and waters. Starting in September, every fourth-grader in the nation will receive an “Every Kid in a Park” pass that’s good for free admission to all of America’s federal lands and waters — for them and their families — for a full year.

Because we know that a big reason many kids don’t visit these places is that they can’t get there easily, we will also help schools and families arrange field trips and visits by providing key trip-planning tools and helping to cover transportation costs for schools with the greatest financial need. For example, the National Park Foundation — the congressionally chartered foundation of the National Park Service — is expanding its program to award transportation grants for kids to visit parks, lands, and waters. The President has also requested new funding in his FY 2016 Budget to support youth education programs and to support transportation for school outings to parks for students from low-income areas.

And because the great outdoors is one of our greatest classrooms, we are making sure that more kids can benefit from the wide range of educational programs and tools that already exist. For example, a number of our agencies participate in Hands on the Land, a national network connecting students, teachers, families, and volunteers with public lands and waterways. And the National Park Service is launching a revised education portal featuring more than 1,000 materials developed for K-12 teachers, including science labs, lesson plans, and field trip guides. With this kind of support, we can help our children become lifelong learners — both inside and outside the classroom.

Designating New National Monuments

Along with the Every Kid in a Park Initiative, the President today announced he is designating three new national monuments to permanently protect sites unique to our Nation’s extraordinary history and natural heritage. In fact, the President has protected more acres of public lands and waters through the Antiquities Act than any other administration. Together, these actions will help us make sure young people will get to experience for themselves some of America’s greatest assets. We hope that these efforts mean that next year, fourth-graders in Chicago will learn how activists in their city prompted the 20th century labor and civil rights movement at the Pullman National Monument, that an elementary school class in Colorado will discover the spectacular landscape of Browns Canyon National Monument, and that kids in Hawaii will learn more about the tremendous value of our civil rights at the Honouliuli National Monument. And decades from now, those children will get to share America’s heritage and wonder with their own families.


The Pullman National Monument will preserve and highlight America’s first planned industrial town, and a site that tells important stories about the social dynamics of the industrial revolution, of American opportunity and discrimination, and of the rise of labor unions and the struggle for civil rights and economic opportunity for African Americans and other minorities. Photo courtesy of Office of State Historic Sites, Illinois Historic Preservation Agency.


Browns Canyon National Monument in Colorado will protect a stunning section of Colorado’s upper Arkansas River Valley. Located in Chaffee County near the town of Salida, Colorado, the 21,586-acre monument features rugged granite cliffs, colorful rock outcroppings, and mountain vistas that are home to a diversity of plants and wildlife, including bighorn sheep and golden eagles. In addition to supporting a vibrant outdoor recreation economy, the designation will protect the critical watershed and honor existing water rights and uses. Photo by Bob Wick, U.S. Department of Interior, Bureau of Land Management.

Honouliuli National Monument in Hawaii permanently protects a site where Japanese American citizens, resident immigrants, and prisoners of war were held captive during World War II. Located on the island of Oahu, the monument will help tell the difficult story of the internment camp’s impact on the Japanese American community and the fragility of civil rights during times of conflict. Photo by R.H. Lodge, courtesy Hawaii’s Plantation Village.

Arne Duncan is Secretary of Education.

Sally Jewell is Secretary of the Interior.

Tom Vilsack is Secretary of Agriculture.

Jo-Ellen Darcy is Assistant Secretary of the Army for Civil Works.

Kathryn Sullivan is  Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere at the Department of Commerce, NOAA.

Categories: Higher Education News

Where Are They Now? Revisiting the “12 for Life” Program

U.S. Department of Education Blog - February 19, 2015 - 6:10am

12 for Life has provided technical, leadership and life skills for many students. (U.S. Department of Education)

Last fall, during the 2014 Partners in Progress Back-to-School Bus Tour, Secretary of Education Arne Duncan had the opportunity to meet with several inspiring students participating in 12 for Life, a program created by a private business called Southwire. While on a tour of the factory floor, the students shared inspiring and deeply personal testimonies about how 12 for Life has provided technical, leadership and life skills while enabling them to earn their high school diploma .

Brittany Beach’s story is one we will remember for many years to come. Brittany was pregnant when her high school counselor suggested she apply to 12 for Life. “Not one time did not graduating cross my mind,” she said, “Being here gave me the opportunity to attend school and not give up, because of the supports.” Now Brittany is enrolled at West Georgia Technical College and expects to be certified as a nursing assistant. There is a job waiting for her at the nearby veteran’s hospital, she said, and she wants to continue her training to become a registered nurse.

Many of her peers in 12 for Life have similar stories and are the first ones in their families ever to graduate from high school. The data confirms that Brittany is not alone. Over 5 million 14-to-24-year-olds in the U.S. are neither working nor in school.

Across the U.S., public-private partnerships are responding to address the urgency of this crisis, and 12 for Life is one example. This cooperative education program was developed in 2007 and targets many of the most vulnerable youth who are at the greatest risk of not completing high school in Georgia. Since the program’s launch, the district’s dropout rate has plunged from 35 percent to 22 percent. The program has been so successful, in fact, that it is expanding. In 2013, Carroll County School was awarded a four-year $3 million federal Investing in Innovation grant, which helped expand a version of the program in three counties and is helping start similar programs elsewhere in Georgia and other states.

Addressing the needs of the more than 5 million disconnected youth in our nation requires the support of schools and businesses in each community. 12 for Life is a unique approach that sits at the intersection of industry and education. Among the many high school reform and dropout prevention efforts, it is noteworthy not just for the notable gains and clear public benefit, but because Southwire has found the program helps make the company more competitive – providing results for its bottom line while helping develop the future workforce.

Secretary Duncan met with students in the 12 for Life program during the 2014 Partners in Progress Back-to-School Bus Tour. (U.S. Department of Education)

More students, school districts, and employers can benefit from this approach. By using the 12 for Life model, schools and businesses can leverage the strengths they already have to create partnerships that benefit all involved.

Scaling an intervention that works is a good idea. That is why we call on leaders in business, industry, labor, education, and philanthropy to join and coordinate efforts to expand opportunities to millions of youth across the country that need a life changing opportunity like the one 12 for Life represents. This program delivers on the promise of creating real ladders of opportunity.

Johan E. Uvin is Acting Assistant Secretary of the Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education at the U.S. Department of Education.

Categories: Higher Education News

Accreditor Still Has Final Say Over Fate of City College of San Francisco

Chronicle of Higher Education - February 19, 2015 - 2:55am

On paper a California judge ruled against the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges. But he said it could still revoke the college’s accreditation.

Categories: Higher Education News

A College Puts Students to Work, for Their Future and Its Own

Chronicle of Higher Education - February 19, 2015 - 2:55am

Paul Quinn College, in Dallas, is the first urban institution to adopt the work-college model, in which students’ labor both educates them and keeps the campus going.

Categories: Higher Education News

Its Future in Doubt, South Carolina State Ponders Its Disastrous Recent Past

Chronicle of Higher Education - February 19, 2015 - 2:55am

A South Carolina legislative committee has voted to remove the university’s president and Board of Trustees, and temporarily give the power to the state.

Categories: Higher Education News

In Australia, Concerns Grow Over a Possible Exodus of Top Researchers

Chronicle of Higher Education - February 18, 2015 - 11:52am

Cuts in research spending and proposed changes in the country's higher-education policy may be pushing academics to look for work overseas.

Categories: Higher Education News

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