Accreditors Debate the Merits—and Feasibility—of Global Standards

Chronicle of Higher Education - Fri, 2014-01-31 04:00

A worldwide accreditation process would be hard to carry out, and university rankings may already be fulfilling that role, said experts at a conference.

Categories: Higher Education News

Obama Ramps Up Federal Focus on Job Training

Chronicle of Higher Education - Fri, 2014-01-31 03:59

The president has authorized a sweeping review of existing programs and is poised to announce money for new ones that help the long-term unemployed.

Categories: Higher Education News

Obama's Call to Raise Minimum Wage Resonates on Campuses

Chronicle of Higher Education - Fri, 2014-01-31 03:55

One college president says fair pay is a matter of bringing budgetary decisions in line with institutional values.

Categories: Higher Education News

No Laughing Matter: President’s Quip About Art History Pricks Some Ears

Chronicle of Higher Education - Fri, 2014-01-31 03:55

Humanities majors learn problem-solving skills that employers need, says the head of an association of college art professionals.

Categories: Higher Education News

New Site Highlights State and Local Innovative Ideas from Educators’ Perspectives

U.S. Department of Education Blog - Thu, 2014-01-30 14:44

Mandy Tang teaches first graders a math lesson in Chinese. Photo credit: Nancy Zuckerbrod

The U.S. Department of Education has launched a new online resource, PROGRESS, to highlight state and local innovative ideas, promising practices, lessons learned, and resources informed by the implementation of K-12 education reforms.

These stories will showcase the exciting transformations taking place in classrooms, schools, and systems across the country through the leadership of teachers, school, district and state leaders and their partners.

The Department launched PROGRESS to emphasize the voices and perspectives of educators, students, and administrators to better understand how policy changes are spurring education improvement and to draw out what can be learned from areas of progress occurring at the state and local levels.

Read about:

  • Delaware and Hawaii teachers and coaches using data to identify student needs and inform instructional improvement strategies;
  • Maryland elementary school students learning science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) through new foreign language courses;
  • Hundreds of students from rural communities in Florida gaining access to incredible STEM learning opportunities through a state Race to the Top initiative to expand STEM education in rural schools;
  • Tennessee’s 700 teacher-coaches providing 30,000 of their colleagues with intensive summer training on new college- and career-ready standards through an ambitious and comprehensive statewide program;
  • Kentucky’s 100-percent increase in total Advanced Placement (AP) qualifying scores over the last five years, largely driven by the success of the AdvanceKentucky program in expanding access to AP classes for low-income students.

The PROGRESS blog will spotlight partnerships among the U.S. Department of Education, states, districts, educators, and families that are helping to build a better education for children.  Of particular focus is:

  • How students are being prepared to succeed in college and careers;
  • How educators are receiving higher quality support and opportunities; and
  • How innovative leaders and educators are transforming school systems to meet new, higher expectations.

PROGRESS does not recommend or endorse any particular approach. It is intended to share information that can be of use to educators, parents, learners, leaders, and other stakeholders in their efforts to ensure that every student is provided with the highest quality education and expanded opportunities to succeed.

We’re always looking to learn from the field. Have an idea for content? Please let us know via email at progress@ed.gov.

Categories: Higher Education News

New U.S. System Aims to Help Veterans Report Complaints About Colleges

Chronicle of Higher Education - Thu, 2014-01-30 14:00

The system does not single out a specific sector, but for-profit colleges enroll a disproportionate share of veterans and military-service members.

Categories: Higher Education News

ED Accepting Applications for Summer 2014 Internships Through March 15

U.S. Department of Education Blog - Thu, 2014-01-30 09:30

The Department of Education (ED) is the place where you can explore your interests in education policy research and analysis, or intergovernmental relations and public affairs, or even work with social media while learning about the role Federal Government plays in education.

If the above appeals to you, then an internship at ED may be right for you. Not only will an internship at ED provide an opportunity to learn first-hand about federal education policy while developing a variety of other skills, including writing, researching, communication and time-management skills, but interns also participate in group intern events, such as brownbag lunches with ED officials, movie nights and local tours. One of the many advantages to an ED internship is the proximity to some of the most historic and celebrated sites in our nation’s capital, all accessible by walking or taking the metro.

ED is accepting applications for Summer 2014 through March 15. If you are interested in interning for the upcoming summer term, there are three materials you must send before being considered for an interview:

    1. A cover letter summarizing why you wish to work at ED and stating your previous experiences in the line of education, if any. Include here what particular offices interest you, keeping in mind that due to the volume of applications received, you may not be awarded with your first-choice office upon acceptance.
    2. An updated resume.
    3. A completed copy of the Intern Application.

Once these three documents are finalized, prospective interns should send them in one email to StudentInterns@ed.gov with the subject line formatted as follows: Last Name, First Name: Fall Intern Application.

(Note: For candidates also interested in applying specifically to the Office of General Counsel (OGC), please see application requirements here.

An internship at ED is one of the best ways a student can learn about education policy and working in the civil service, but it is not limited to this. Your internship at ED is where you will develop crucial workplace skills that will help you in whatever career path you choose, and it is also where you will meet fellow students like yourself, who share your passions for education, learning, and engagement.

Click here for more information or to get started on your application today.

De’Rell Bonner works in ED’s Office of Communications and Outreach

Categories: Higher Education News

The Road to Opportunity: Education and the State of the Union

U.S. Department of Education Blog - Thu, 2014-01-30 09:11

On Tuesday, during President Obama’s fifth State of the Union address, he reinforced the message that education plays an important role in our country. The President began his speech by noting the critical part that educators play: “Today in America, a teacher spent extra time with a student who needed it, and did her part to lift America’s graduation rate to its highest level in more than three decades.”

President Obama laid out his top priorities, rooted in three key principles: opportunity, action, and optimism. Among the education topics discussed, the President recommitted to making high-quality preschool available to every 4-year-old, connecting 99 percent of students to high-speed broadband over the next four years, redesigning high schools to offer more real-world education and hands-on training, and increasing college opportunity and success.

Educators and students also were well represented in the First Lady’s viewing box. Read more about them here. Below are the education excerpts from the speech:

Of course, it’s not enough to train today’s workforce.  We also have to prepare tomorrow’s workforce, by guaranteeing every child access to a world-class education.

Estiven Rodriguez couldn’t speak a word of English when he moved to New York City at age nine.  But last month, thanks to the support of great teachers and an innovative tutoring program, he led a march of his classmates – through a crowd of cheering parents and neighbors – from their high school to the post office, where they mailed off their college applications.  And this son of a factory worker just found out he’s going to college this fall.

Five years ago, we set out to change the odds for all our kids.  We worked with lenders to reform student loans, and today, more young people are earning college degrees than ever before.  Race to the Top, with the help of governors from both parties, has helped states raise expectations and performance.  Teachers and principals in schools from Tennessee to Washington, D.C. are making big strides in preparing students with skills for the new economy – problem solving, critical thinking, science, technology, engineering, and math.  Some of this change is hard.  It requires everything from more challenging curriculums and more demanding parents to better support for teachers and new ways to measure how well our kids think, not how well they can fill in a bubble on a test.  But it’s worth it – and it’s working.

The problem is we’re still not reaching enough kids, and we’re not reaching them in time.  That has to change.

Early Learning

Research shows that one of the best investments we can make in a child’s life is high-quality early education.  Last year, I asked this Congress to help states make high-quality pre-K available to every four year-old.  As a parent as well as a President, I repeat that request tonight. But in the meantime, thirty states have raised pre-k funding on their own.  They know we can’t wait.  So just as we worked with states to reform our schools, this year, we’ll invest in new partnerships with states and communities across the country in a race to the top for our youngest children.  And as Congress decides what it’s going to do, I’m going to pull together a coalition of elected officials, business leaders, and philanthropists willing to help more kids access the high-quality pre-K they need.

ConnectED

Last year, I also pledged to connect 99 percent of our students to high-speed broadband over the next four years.  Tonight, I can announce that with the support of the FCC and companies like Apple, Microsoft, Sprint, and Verizon, we’ve got a down payment to start connecting more than 15,000 schools and twenty million students over the next two years, without adding a dime to the deficit.

High School Redesign and Student Loans

We’re working to redesign high schools and partner them with colleges and employers that offer the real-world education and hands-on training that can lead directly to a job and career.  We’re shaking up our system of higher education to give parents more information, and colleges more incentives to offer better value, so that no middle-class kid is priced out of a college education.  We’re offering millions the opportunity to cap their monthly student loan payments to ten percent of their income, and I want to work with Congress to see how we can help even more Americans who feel trapped by student loan debt.  And I’m reaching out to some of America’s leading foundations and corporations on a new initiative to help more young men of color facing tough odds stay on track and reach their full potential.

The bottom line is, Michelle and I want every child to have the same chance this country gave us. But we know our opportunity agenda won’t be complete – and too many young people entering the workforce today will see the American Dream as an empty promise – unless we do more to make sure our economy honors the dignity of work, and hard work pays off for every single American.

State of the Union Resources

Learn more about the Obama administration’s major priorities in education:

Cameron Brenchley is director of digital strategy at the U.S. Department of Education

Categories: Higher Education News

Conference Gives Hints of How Accreditation May Change

Chronicle of Higher Education - Thu, 2014-01-30 03:58

At the Council for Higher Education Accreditation’s annual meeting, speakers noted some of the system’s problems and suggested solutions.

Categories: Higher Education News

College Football Players Seek to Form a Labor Union

Chronicle of Higher Education - Wed, 2014-01-29 03:58

The Northwestern University athletes are petitioning to be recognized as employees, citing “unjust NCAA rules” that affect them physically and financially.

Categories: Higher Education News

Strong U.S. Stock Market Put College Endowments Back in the Black in 2013

Chronicle of Higher Education - Tue, 2014-01-28 16:28

The funds enjoyed average investment returns of 11.7 percent, a year after those returns were minus 0.3 percent, according to a new survey.

Categories: Higher Education News

Students, Educators to Join First Lady During State of the Union

U.S. Department of Education Blog - Tue, 2014-01-28 10:24

In less than 12 hours, President Barack Obama will deliver his fifth State of the Union Address. Education is sure to be one of the topics the President addresses in a speech that will lay out “practical proposals to grow the economy, strengthen the middle class, and empower all who hope to join it.”

For decades, First Ladies have invited extraordinary Americans that match the themes of the State of the Union Address to join them in her viewing box. This year, educators and students are well represented:

Joey Hudy
“Maker” and Intel Intern – Anthem, Ariz.

Joey Hudy is a self-described “Maker,” part of a growing community of young people, adults, and entrepreneurs who are designing and building things on their own time. Joey first shot to fame in 2012 when, at 14-years-old, he attended the White House Science Fair where the President took a turn using the contraption he had made — the “extreme marshmallow cannon” – and launched a marshmallow across the East Room. Joey then handed the President a card with his credo: “Don’t be bored, make something.” Now 16, he has continued to live by his motto, appearing at Maker Faires all across the country. Joey, a proponent of STEM education, is determined to teach other kids about how they can make and do anything they want. Joey lives in Anthem, Arizona with his mom, dad, and older sister. Earlier this month, he started as Intel’s youngest intern, a position Intel CEO Brian Krzanich offered him on the spot at his Maker Faire exhibit.

Kathy Hollowell-Makle
2013 DCPS Teacher of the Year – Washington, D.C.

Kathy Hollowell-Makle was named 2013’s District of Columbia Public School’s Teacher of the Year after more than 15 years teaching in the District. Kathy began as a Teach for America corps member in the District in 1998 and currently teaches at Abram Simon Elementary in Southeast Washington, DC. By the school year’s end, more than 90 percent of her students demonstrate early literacy at proficient or advanced levels and last year, more than 80 percent of her students advanced two or more reading levels. Kathy contributed some of her experience and expertise to a roundtable with Secretary of Education Arne Duncan regarding early childhood education. Kathy emphasizes a positive attitude and focuses on fluency in reading, writing and counting, explaining: “The best part of teaching is having former students recognize me, and being able to see how wonderful they turned out to be.” Kathy lives in Washington, DC with her husband Stephen and two sons Amir and Ian. She is originally from New Orleans, Louisiana.

Aliana Arzola- Piñero
2013 Kids State Dinner Attendee – San Juan, Puerto Rico

Aliana Arzola-Piñero, from San Juan, Puerto Rico, is in fourth grade at the Colegio Puertorriqueño de Niñas. Aliana is an avid reader and gymnast who loves to cook with her grandma, something she’s done since she was two-years-old. She participated in the 2012 Healthy Lunchtime Challenge sponsored by the First Lady. While she didn’t win, she worked hard, tried again, and her perseverance paid off as she proudly represented Puerto Rico at the 2013 Kid’s State Dinner hosted by the First Lady. Her winning recipe “Yummy Eggplant Lasagna Rolls,” incorporates the “My Plate” guidelines. Aliana has worked hard to translate her experience visiting the White House into concrete steps to benefit her community, championing healthy eating and an active lifestyle for kids.

Cristian Avila
DREAMer, “Core Faster” and Voter Engagement Coordinator, Mi Familia Vota – Phoenix, Ariz.

Cristian Avila, 23, was brought to the United States with his younger brother and sister when he was nine-years-old. Though Cristian became an All-American scholar by 7th grade and received a full scholarship to a private Jesuit high school, he was limited by his undocumented status. Last year he received temporary relief from deportation through Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). The 23-year-old Arizona resident started volunteering with Mi Familia Vota, a non-profit Latino civic engagement program, at the age of 16, and he was one of the core fasters in the Fast for Families demonstration late last year at the foot of the Capitol, which the President, Vice President, First Lady and Cabinet and Administration officials visited. After 22 days, he passed on the fast to others but has continued to push Congress to take up comprehensive immigration reform. Cristian is fighting for commonsense immigration reform so he can one day join the US Marine Corps and serve our country in uniform.

Sabrina Simone Jenkins – Charleston, S.C.

Sabrina Simone Jenkins – through obstacle after obstacle – has persevered in getting herself educated, determined to make a better life for herself and her family. Sabrina is a single mother to her teenage daughter Kenya. After serving in the Air Force, Sabrina took classes at DeVry University while working full time, graduating with a 3.7 GPA at the age of 42 – all while caring for ailing family members and becoming seriously ill herself. Sabrina then earned her master’s degree in human resources in 2012. Sabrina is currently saddled with nearly $90,000 in student loan debt, something that will only worsen as she pays for Kenya to go to college. Sabrina’s remarkable resolve through incredibly difficult circumstances brought her to the attention of The Shriver Report, which seeks to highlight the 1 in 3 American women living on the brink of poverty. The President is determined to help people like Sabrina – Americans who are working hard and doing the right things – get ahead.

Antoinette Tuff
DeKalb County Bookkeeper – Atlanta, Ga.

On August 20, 2013, the world learned of the compassion and heroism of Antoinette Tuff, the DeKalb County bookkeeper who prevented a shooting at Ronald E. McNair Discovery Learning Academy, an elementary school in the suburbs of Atlanta. Tuff, a mother of one daughter and one son, talked the would-be shooter down, sharing her personal struggles, discussing love and doing her best to connect with him until he surrendered before harming anyone. Now, instead of being known for another tragic school shooting, August 20, 2013 is remembered for one woman’s grace under pressure. The President called Tuff after the ordeal and has said what she did was “remarkable.” Antoinette has been nominated for the Carnegie Medal for civilian heroism.

Estiven Rodriguez
Student, Washington Heights Expeditionary Learning School – New York, N.Y. Estiven Rodriguez is the son of a Dominican immigrant, he arrived in the United States when he was nine years old and didn’t speak any English. When he entered Washington Heights Expeditionary Learning School (WHEELS) in the sixth grade, he still spoke and understood very limited English. Now a high school senior, Estiven is one of the top students in his class and will attend Dickinson College in the fall on a Posse Foundation Scholarship, making him a first-generation college student. “At only 16, 17 years old, he, in many ways, embodies the spirit of a life-long learner. He is a model student,” said Erick Espin, Estiven’s 11th grade United States history teacher. Outside of his academic studies, Estiven is also a member of the school’s math club, and soccer and track teams. Earlier this month, Estiven attended an event at the White House on expanding college opportunity.  His story underscores the importance of the President’s goal to give all kids a chance to get ahead, regardless of the circumstances of their birth.

Watch an enhanced version of the State of the Union on WhiteHouse.gov, and find out how you can engage with the Administration following the address.

 Cameron Brenchley is director of digital strategy at the U.S. Department of Education

Categories: Higher Education News

State Attorneys General Open New Investigations Into For-Profit Colleges

Chronicle of Higher Education - Tue, 2014-01-28 03:58

More than a dozen states are collaborating in the new inquiries. But federal scrutiny and drops in enrollment may pose greater challenges for the sector.

Categories: Higher Education News

Students Who Transfer to a For-Profit College May Pay Later

Chronicle of Higher Education - Tue, 2014-01-28 03:57

The sector’s flexibility lets working students earn more while in college. But 10 years down the road, a study finds, the earnings advantage is reversed.

Categories: Higher Education News

The Belfast Project's Lessons for Oral History: Talk Live With the Experts

Chronicle of Higher Education - Tue, 2014-01-28 03:55

The Chronicle talked with two oral-history experts about lessons to be learned from a Boston College project that went awry. View a video of the conversation here.

Categories: Higher Education News

Seminary’s New Leader to Help Shape Reform Judaism

Chronicle of Higher Education - Mon, 2014-01-27 11:01
Rabbi Aaron D. Panken, of Hebrew Union College, will oversee three U.S. campuses and one in Jerusalem that prepare spiritual leaders for the modern world.
Categories: Higher Education News

With U. of Michigan Hire, Another Ivy League Provost Goes Public

Chronicle of Higher Education - Mon, 2014-01-27 03:55

Trustees at major public research institutions may believe that officials at elite colleges are better at securing research dollars and private money, one expert says.

Categories: Higher Education News
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